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Kiswahili Bloggers this week

Tanzanian Kiswahili bloggers continue to write about the presidential and parliamentary elections taking at the end of the month. Mwandani comes across an open letter of advice addressed to the “incoming president,” Jakaya Kikwete.

Although Tanzanians have not yet cast their votes to elect the new president, the ruling party’s victory is a foregone conclusion. Miruko does not understand the meaning of election if the results are known long before the election. Tanzania elects its president and members of parliament every five years.

Kazonta thinks it is a joke that the Prevention of Corruption Bureau (PCB) conducted a seminar on ways to combat corrupt practices in election campaigns few days before the election. He does not know why PCB waited this long.

As unemployment becomes one of the main social problems facing young people in Tanzania, Gaphiz reports about an organization using a bilingual website (Kiswahili and English) to address this problem.

Funguajicho, a Tanzanian student in Uganda, discusses Ugandan politics, particularly the the return of the leading opposition candidate, Dr.Kiiza Besigye, from exile in South Africa

Harakati
writes a long article about the dangers of Tanzanian “Bongo Flava” artists losing cultural identity by copying everything from America. “If you are singing and dressed like 50 Cent, why should I listen to you instead of 50 Cent?,” he asks.

Ngurumo wonders who owns the Tanzanian national flag since the Tanzania National Electoral Commission wants to punish Chama cha Demokrasia na Maendeleo (the party of democracy and development) for using national flag colors on its campaign materials.

Issa Michuzi posts photos of Dar Es Salaam twin towers and of himself dancing with the Maasai in Arusha, Tanzania.

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