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African Women Blogging

“Are we are a definition of ourselves, or other people's definition of us,” ponders Keeper of her thoughts and asks whether her identity is one “…constructed for myself as a response to a global hierarchy that places the African woman at the very bottom of the rung? Or is it a facet of my identity that's always been there but has never needed to assert itself?”

With voting over in the Liberian elections and a new president about to declared, Black Looks writes about the founding of Liberia whose recent civil war is directly related to the forceful taking or buying of land for virtually nothing from indigenous chiefs by African Americans who settled in Liberia in the 18th Century. This led to conditions which in many aspects was not so different from other colonised African countries.

Black Looks also celebrates the awarding of the International Press Freedom Award to Beatrice Mtetwa a Zimbabwean human rights lawyer by the Committee to Protect Journalists.

Meanwhile, in view of the current constitutional crisis threatening to tear Kenya apart, Chanuka calls upon fellow Kenyans to first read and understand the contents of the Kenyan Constitution before voting on the upcoming referendum and not be swayed by politicians who may not have the interests of Kenyans at heart.

Boitumelo Mofokeng writes about the debate around the United Nations Security Council Resolution 1325 which is the first resolution ever passed by the Security Council specifically addressing the impact of war on women, and women's contributions to conflict resolution and sustainable peace. Boitumelo is categorical there would have been no need for this resolution had the UN been an inclusive and progressive organisation right from the start. She points out the UN is lacking in gender balance as can be seen in the disproportionate numbers of women working in auxiliary and support roles within the organisation and as a result, has lost the opportunity of setting a good example for the governments it seeks challenge. She concludes by telling the UN, “it's either with us but not without us! Hear our voices!”

Solar energy is not just about environmentalism says Afromusing who writes about companies that have made millions of dollars in profit through renewable technology .

Although the recently held Car Free Day in Johannesburg was mainly unsuccessful due to an inadequate public transport system, Bronwyn feels the publicity around the environment can only be a good thing and insists the media has to keep writing about this critical issue and also hold leaders accountable.

Nneka gives a memorable response to a suitor who once told her, ”I like girls like you, because you don’t ask questions”.

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