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Echoes from the Tunisian blogosphere

TuniZika, the first bi-monthly Tunisian musical podcast, releases it's second show, featuring music from a number of new artists.

Zizou from Djerba attends his first Lebanese blogger meetup since he went there to study in the AUB. He's also writing about his discovery of Lebanon (in French), the different places there, the life, the culture and more.

Marwen is profiled in a feature article about blogs in Computer Idee magazine, the number one computer magazine in the Netherlands.

Adib writes (in French) about how his friend Anis Ltaeif was chosen to pass to the second round of SuperStar, the Arab version of Pop Idol, and how he attended a photoshoot with him at Latina restaurant in Les Berges du Lac.

K-pax blogs from Montreal, Canada (in French) , after a 10 hour flight there and over 2 hours of immigration paperwork at the airport. He's looking forward to resting and then getting started with his integration there.

Thysdrus writes about a picture of an old man in front of the El Jem colisseum that he found on the internet, and wonders if the man, who he personally knows, has any idea that his picture is online now making it's way around the world.

Keitaro complains (in French) about how bad the ADSL service is in the Hammam Chott zone, and how the ISPs never have a good answer when he calls them for support, just saying that they're debating with the telecom operator. He's annoyed that ISPs think the connection is an added privilege, while it's a right that he's paying money for.

Hatem writes about the holy month of Ramadan and how some people have forgotten what it's all about, making it a month of food. He thinks they should go back to the Quran to be reminded of all the benefits of this month.

1 comment

  • These are nice blogs to discover and to know about but these blogs are not censored in Tunisia. Any one can read them any time.

    The world needs to know about censored blogs and Tunisian militants for Freedom of Expression.

    Visit http://www.yezzi.org/

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