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Blog Day 2005

blogday

Blog Day 2005 is making waves throughout the global blogosphere. The one-day celebration, which encourages bloggers to introduce their readers to five new weblogs from other cultures or perspectives, has been adding nearly a page of relevant posts to Technorati every hour.

Romanian blogger, Carmen Holotescu asks her readers to consider each of the over-300 weblogs in her Romanian Weblog Collection as part of her Blog Day recommendations, but then goes on to obey rules by listing five specific blogs (two in Romanian and three in English) focusing on photography and design. Ethan Zuckerman, a connoisseur of international weblogs, also linked to blogs written in Romanian, but from the neighboring country of Moldova.

Yzabel, a 26-year-old graphic designer and tech writer in France lists her five recommendations in both English and French. Elvira Black, writing from New York City, in turn, links to Yzabel as one of her five Blog Day links. Also included are bloggers from the UK, Australia, and even Texas.

Venezuelan blogger, Iria Puyosa, has chosen two blogs in English and two in Spanish written from the U.S.A., Norway, Chile, as well as one by a Panamanian living in the Middle East. Alvaro Ramirez Ospina, a film professor from Norway who writes in Spanish, linked back to Iria as one of his five links and left a comment thanking her for extending an important bridge. Another Venezuelan, Leonel Sanchez chose to link to bloggers in Peru, Chile, Spain, and a Colombian living in Dhaka, Bangladesh.

Steven of Singabloodypore linked to bloggers from the U.S., Hong Kong, Zimbabwe, India, and Burma. Fábio of Caryorker, a Brazilian living in New York pointed his readers to three weblogs in Portuguese and two in English. Lucia Lai, meanwhile, notes that much of the Malaysian blogosphere has ignored Blog Day while focusing on the Merdeka Blogger Project, but she offers her five links nonetheless.

Not everyone is so enthusiastic about the project however. Arzan, who splits his time between Mumbai and New York City, says that every day should be Blog Day and that “the actual naming of a day for blogging, demeans it a little.” Then, however, as Desi Pundit notes, “he goes ahead and lists few of his favorite blogs and even the one he doesn’t want you to read.”

Besides the seemingly infinite amount of hyperlinks spreading themselves across our planet today, many groups of local bloggers have been meeting up to commemorate the occasion. Bernard DeCarroux scheduled a bloggers reunion in Paris, France, while, Spanish bloggers are currently at Starbucks Plaza de España in Madrid and in Strousbourg non-Parisian French bloggers are getting together at the Lanterne micro-brewery.

It's wonderful to see so much cross-country, cross-cultural, and cross-language interaction throughout the blogosphere today and we hope the tradition is preserved for years to come. You can find more bloggers from around the globe participating in Blog Day 2005 at Technorati, IceRocket, Feedster, and BlogPulse. Or if you've participated yourself, tell us about it by leaving a comment linking to your recommendations.

  • Very nice reporting David. Meaningful and entertaining. Thanks for the mention

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  • I think I missed this occassion due to heavy workload. Anyhow, this is a very good idea. I wish this would serve as the real bridge for peace and understanding among all nations.

    Congratulations to All.

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