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Vietnam: Cottontimer

Cottontimer is a Chinese-American who keeps two blogs to occupy her hours as full-time mum in Vietnam – one on her daily life call Cotton Picking Days (read: MSG poisoning), and the other on genetics and public health. She's a former PhD epidemiologist.

5 comments

  • I’m so flattered to be noticed but also a bit perturbed. Have we bumped into each other somewhere before, Jeff?

  • to occupy her hours as full-time mum

    BTW, I just want to point out that full-time moms already have their hours “occupied”. Maybe you didn’t mean it this way, but I resent the implication that full-time moms don’t already have their hands full and need to blog in order to do something productive with their day besides just sit around.

  • I have to agree with Lei here. Nice to point out her wonderful sites – and they are full of great information, and not just for the scientific types, but, to suggest that anyone (moms or dads) who stay home to raise children need something *else* to do, well, it’s beyond me.

  • […] Just when I was starting to get real, I find that both Cotton-Pickin’ Days and the Genetics and Public Health Blog were included in the Global Roundups* at Harvard’s Global Voices Online. It’s both flattering and a bit disturbing. With every small bit of recognition, I get more confused. What’s the blogosphere trying to tell me? Should I get serious and stop fantasizing about having an online career or should I actually consider it? […]

  • […] Mentioned at Harvard’s Global Voices Online. […]

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