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News from Chinese Blogosphere

After Tencent required its QQ Group users to register their real name, poll shows that near half of people would abandon the use of this popular IM software. Also 65% of them are against the policy of so-called “real name registration” if implemented by government widely.

Another interesting story about real name registration. A citizen named ZhenTao Lee who claimed to be an advocate of the policy published his real name and ID number on one of the major BBS. But other users searched the number by Google and found that this ID was faked on the official website of local government . When they challenged his credibility they found that his profile was changed by his “employer” overnight. It was generally regarded as planned by Internet supervisory body.

This week the six party talk was held in BeiJing trying to resolve North Korea nuclear crisis. Chinese online communities followed up the story closely.

Bill Clinton will be the keynote speaker at the 2005 China Internet Summit at West Lake, to be held on September 10, 2005, organized by Alibaba.com, a famous e-commerce company. People doubt that he would bring any real issues.

Made in June, a Chinese blogger happened to discover the list of prohibited words used in Blogcn.com, the second largest Blog Service Provider. The list include most of the name of the leaders, dissidents and controversially historical events. He used the ADblock plugin in FireFox to find the “Bad Word”.

Bokee, formerly known as Blogchina, announced its partnership with Feedburner. Feedburner would provide Bokee with its first-rated RSS feed management.

TaiWan bloggers called the local blogosphere for action to unite against the corrupted baseball scandal, involving gambling and control of the game by underground operation.

Douglas Kellner, the celebrated right wing blogger arrived at TaiWan for a meeting. He accepted the interview from TaiWan bloggers, talking about the responsibilities of media.

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