Close

Support Global Voices

To stay independent, free, and sustainable, our community needs the help of friends and readers like you.

Donate now »

See all those languages up there? We translate Global Voices stories to make the world's citizen media available to everyone.

Learn more about Lingua Translation  »

News from Chinese Blogosphere

After Tencent required its QQ Group users to register their real name, poll shows that near half of people would abandon the use of this popular IM software. Also 65% of them are against the policy of so-called “real name registration” if implemented by government widely.

Another interesting story about real name registration. A citizen named ZhenTao Lee who claimed to be an advocate of the policy published his real name and ID number on one of the major BBS. But other users searched the number by Google and found that this ID was faked on the official website of local government . When they challenged his credibility they found that his profile was changed by his “employer” overnight. It was generally regarded as planned by Internet supervisory body.

This week the six party talk was held in BeiJing trying to resolve North Korea nuclear crisis. Chinese online communities followed up the story closely.

Bill Clinton will be the keynote speaker at the 2005 China Internet Summit at West Lake, to be held on September 10, 2005, organized by Alibaba.com, a famous e-commerce company. People doubt that he would bring any real issues.

Made in June, a Chinese blogger happened to discover the list of prohibited words used in Blogcn.com, the second largest Blog Service Provider. The list include most of the name of the leaders, dissidents and controversially historical events. He used the ADblock plugin in FireFox to find the “Bad Word”.

Bokee, formerly known as Blogchina, announced its partnership with Feedburner. Feedburner would provide Bokee with its first-rated RSS feed management.

TaiWan bloggers called the local blogosphere for action to unite against the corrupted baseball scandal, involving gambling and control of the game by underground operation.

Douglas Kellner, the celebrated right wing blogger arrived at TaiWan for a meeting. He accepted the interview from TaiWan bloggers, talking about the responsibilities of media.

11 comments

  • nicotinestain

    Hi, Frank,

    Just happened to see this post entry and it is surprising to see that you would say “the Bokee didn’t have a good attitude toward the cooperation”. It is probably because I work in bokee as a technician. I have left a comment below keso (the blogger you quoted)’s blog http://blog.donews.com/keso/archive/2005/07/27/484049.aspx
    Did not find this post entry on your personal blog. Therefore I have to comment here again because I figured that the words are not from keso.
    It is perfect okay that you have your own personal judgement. But it is not always nice to interpret your own judgement as the attitude of the other people. I myself worked a little bit on the preparation of the cooperation with feedburner and spent a whole weekend on preparing a demo. If you get the conclusion that bokee doesn’t have good attitude to work with feedburner because of something else. I would be grateful for that you could specifically tell what are the things you made this conclusion on and/or how did they logically related one with another.

    I respect you for working hard to spread your voice. We might have diffrent view of life. It is all perfectly okay. So I comment here only very personally because this intereprtation of bokee’s attitude is not the truth.

    Sorry to interrupt you and/or made this opposite comment. Basing on your previous post entries and your Chinese blog entries, I believe that you’re not (even thinking about) lying on stuffs. It is just that you used too much of your own sense but ignored the wrong judgement is unfair to other people.

    I speak for my own personal’s view. It is not a bokee’s official comment. Please pardon me if you find this comment too informal.
    Thank you for reading.

  • […] News from Chinese Blogosphere […]

  • Well Sorry for that. I’ve change the link.
    It’s just Keso’s opinion and should not appear on the GVO.
    What we report should be the plain facts based on reliable sources.
    I would explain detailedly on my personal blog for next several days.
    Thanks!

  • hi, Frank

    Actually, kellner never get nominated by Time magazine. the editorial note of that intervew just list an example to show the rihgt wing blog got much influnance than left ones in American blogosphere.

  • Frank,
    For people who are not familiar with the Chinese blogosphere’s discussion, could you explain a bit more about why some Chinese bloggers think that Bokee doesn’t have a good attitude?
    Thanks!
    Rebecca

  • To Rebacca:
    As I have mention in previous comment
    I’ve changed the link and sentences because I thought it’s a personal opinion which is not suitable for here.
    Frank

  • Frank,

    Interesting news about the QQ program.

    I was doing some work on a friends computer here in Chengdu and his wife was upset because I couldn’t get the QQ installation to run properly on an English Operating System platform and when I started sifting through the inner workings of QQ I realized that it was basically a cover for the spy software that is installed with it.

    It’s a 20+MB program and it heavily embeds itself into the deepest levels of the PC once the installation process is initiated. I couldn’t believe it. I’ve never seen something so extensive for such a seemingly simple chat program.

    His wife didn’t believe me until after her brother (a physicist professor) confirmed my discoveries.

    I’m willing to be that very few, if any, realize this. If they did, I imagine QQ wouldn’t be so popular.

  • to inertia
    Well I refer to the editorial note to write the news.
    I thought the Power Line was his blog.
    I’ve modify the term.

  • Frank,
    I think we would still like to know why some Chinese bloggers are critical of Bokee. Even if you are not comfortable giving your personal opinion, can you explain what Chinese bloggers are saying about Bokee and why? Maybe that’s a subject for a separate post, but I still think it would be really interesting, as I’m sure there is a wide range of views and those view will be very instructive to people trying to understand the Chinese blogosphere.
    Thanks!

  • Rebacca:
    OK. It’s quite impossible to understand Chinese blogosphere without mentioning Bokee, a highly controversial term.
    Maybe next few day I will try to explain the matter on a separate post.
    Frank

Join the conversation

Authors, please log in »

Guidelines

  • All comments are reviewed by a moderator. Do not submit your comment more than once or it may be identified as spam.
  • Please treat others with respect. Comments containing hate speech, obscenity, and personal attacks will not be approved.