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Friday World Blog Roundup

200505_womanSouth Asia:
Dina Metha has a photo essay of village women in India. (photo: Dina Metha)

The Corporate Social Responsibility weblog points to a report that there are 315,000 child laborers in Pakistan.

Eurasia:
Blogrel summarizes Armenian media reports about the U.S. billionaire Kirk Kirkorian, who is of Armenian descent, and whose foundation is said in Armenia to have contributed to “a large part” of the country's economic growth.
Onnik also asks: “Is a ‘velvet’ revolution ripe in Armenia?”

Voch Me Ban has more on possible reforms in Armenia.

Registan.net posts on Azerbaijan's Beleaguered Opposition, amid news that an Azeri opposition leader has died under mysterious circumstances. He links to a post by the Democracy Guy, who believes Azerbaijan will be a test for the Bush Administration “in which the democracy doctrine will either be shown as real policy, or merely neo-con happy talk.”

Central Asia:
On Uzbekistan, Nathan at Registan has his usual thorough roundup, then asks some tough questions about U.S. policy.

There is a new Uzbekistan blog: Radio Silence.

Thinking-East is covering the Mongolian elections (scheduled for Sunday) here and here.

East Asia:
ESWN has a full English translation of the original article in the Chinese-language Nanfang Weekly about Chinese “undercover internet commentators” that got picked up quickly by the international press. ESWN reports: “these news reports came to the attention of the almighty Internet nanny, and the original article has been removed from the Nanfang Weekend website.” Fortunately you can read the whole thing in both languages on his blog.
… ESWN has another interesting post on how statistics get hyped in China.

Bingfeng Teahouse has a photo essay on media brainwashing.

Chinadigitaltimes.net has a good collection of links today on the currency issue.

According to Slashdot: Asia is the “next frontier” in blogging.

Middle East:
Joshua Landis at Syriacomment.com describes the Syrian blogging scene.

Mohammed in Cairo asks: “what about Egyptian bloggers?”

Iranscan links to an interview with presidential candidate Hooshang Amirahmadi, and a Human Rights Watch report about abuse of dissident members by an exiled Iranian group.

Adventures with Mr.Behi reacts to the report with the headline: “Exchanging monarchs for monsters? Hell NO!”

Iranian Truth challenges the assumption that good Muslim women must wear headscarves.

Aref-Adib thinks Khomeini and Connery look kind of alike.

Iraqi bloggers have much to say about the Saddam underpants photo:
Kurdo's world is gleeful. So is the Kurdistan Bloggers Union.

Raed in the Middle (who generally wants the U.S. out) did not comment directly, but posted the underpants cover photo along with enlarged photos of the dead faces of Saddam's sons which were part of an Israeli photo exhibit.

A Free Writer posts a survey on Iraqi living conditions.

Iraq the Model has the first in a series of posts following the drafting process of Iraq's new constitution.

Africa:
Thinker's Room explains how some people seem to be more equal than others in Kenya.

African Bullets & Honey believes “the Kenyan government is at war with its own people,” and asks where Africa's heroes have gone.

Black Looks describes a “shocking story” of Cassava wars in Nigeria.

Afrotecnik links to new gadgetry for places with limited electricity: a self-winding mobile phone charger and foot charger that works with some laptops.

Timbuktu chronicles has some links about how the spread of mobile phones in Africa will help create a new middle class.

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