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Uzbekistan breaking news

Thanks to for pointing out that the “Scraps of Moscow” blog is translating news and analysis from the Russian press on the Uzbekistan protest and crackdown story… in which troops are reported to have fired on protestors. Click here and here.

If you have links to any more blog-coverage on Uzbekistan, please post them in the “comments” section of this post.


  • Dan

    A lot of these extracts from the russian newswires are available in English already: RIA-Novosti (a huge, clunky agency that grew out of the Soviet propaganda machine) is the source Scraps of Moscow is using. Of the other big newswires, ITAR-TASS also has a lot of free content in English.

    Russian-speakers (or babelfish users) might like to follow events through Yandex, which aggregates most of the news. this search (for Andizhan in cyrillic) should get a decent chunk of the coverage.

    I don’t know the Russian-language blogosphere, but I can offer to do some translating if I’m pointed in the right direction.

  • I finally got to some more obscure sources that aren’t available in English (unless they’ve been cited by Western wire agencies, which is entirely possible) – posts from here and here, as well as one from here.

    There is lots available in English at RIA Novosti’s English-language page, although you have to take it with a grain of salt since it’s got a pro-Russian-government bias.

    As for the Russian-language blogosphere, the place where there was great firsthand reporting on the revolution in Kyrgyzstan was on the LiveJournal blog of a young Russian woman living in Bishkek (back in March, I posted about her coverage here), so maybe checking out the Russian LJ community is the place to look.

  • A search of Russian LJ (or ZhZh) websites for Andijan (“Андижан”) didn’t find any first-hand accounts, unfortunately. One blog which several LJ’ers linked to as the most knowledgeable on Russian LJ had just one post on the subject.

    I did also find this post, which includes a number of photos of the events in Andijan, some of which I have not seen elsewhere, on a Russian LJ blog. However, the person posting them admits that they were emailed to him and he’s not sure of the original source.

    Blogger is down for maintenance, so I’ve posted a couple of other interesting items I’ve found recently on the Andijan events in the comments section on

  • OK, sorry to post so many separate comments on the same issue, but here’s another Russian LJ page with a summary of yesterday’s events in Andijan, Uzbekistan. This one only covers events until noon Moscow time on Friday, and the author states that the reason he aggregated all of the content (Russian-language content, I should mention) in one post is because, source for some of the best information about these events, was intermittently unavailable.

    Also, it appears that the post of photos I mentioned in my previous comment contains (uncredited) AP photos.

    And blogger is back up, so I’ve posted several new items about the Andijan uprising. Nothing original, really – after all, I’m not on the scene – just highlights of what I’ve been able to find on the web.

  • There does not seem to be too much blog-generated original content on the unrest in Andijan other than what’s been mentioned here already. I did a Technorati search for “Andijan” and “Andijon,” and the best of the results are here.

  • […] rn (I hate to define something as a negative: is there a better term?) web sites providing insight into the protests and brutal government crackdown in Uzbekistan. Rebecca MacK […]

  • The big news recently regarding Uzbekistan is in the developments regarding the former British Ambassador, Craig Murray. He has just published on the internet, via several blogs copies of papers from the British Foreign Office regarding the sanctioning of the use of torture to extract information from prisoners. He details discussions between his office and Westminster and comments from CIA operations. Fascinating material which has aroused some considerable disquiet in the UK and beyond.

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