· May, 2010

Stories about Uganda from May, 2010

Egypt: No Longer Jewel of the Nile

Four of the seven upstream Nile Basin Initiative countries have decided to sign a new Nile deal. Despite strong Egyptian and Sudanese opposition, Tanzania, Uganda, Rwanda and Ethiopia signed a new water-sharing agreement. Egyptian bloggers react to the news in this post by Marwa Rakha.

Africa: International Day Against Homophobia and Transphobia comes to Africa

  17 May 2010

International Day Against Homophobia and Transphobia (IDAHO)) is a day is recognized by people joining together to speak out against homophobia, its effects and results focusing on ways to change how people perceive homosexuality and promote equality. The day is held on May 17 every year. The focus this year is on three Africa countries: Kenya, Uganda and Malawi.

Africa: Homophobia exists in Africa

  9 May 2010

“Homophobia exists in Africa, as does influenza,” argues blogger Gukira: “This comparison is only partly gratuitous as I am interested in scales of virulence. We know that African bees are the deadliest; the sun in Africa is hotter than anywhere else in the world; viruses from Africa are the most...

Uganda: Mapping water sources

  8 May 2010

Tom Loughran blogs about mapping water sources in Uganda: “Each of the points on the map contains the results of a proof-of-concept water quality test, and a hyperlink to images and additional information about the water source…The location and water quality data are entered into a Google form embedded in...

Uganda: Reports from the Call Uganda meetings

  4 May 2010

Sokari links to published reports on the Call Uganda prayer meetings: “The rhetoric was as expected and The Call founder, Lou Engles’ press release last week that he was not anti-homosexual were simply untrue. Behind the Mask reported on Engle’s who claimed the West were using “Ugandan NGO’s to promote...

Tech for Transparency in Sub-Saharan Africa

  2 May 2010

Transparency and accountability efforts are supported by a growing tech community in sub-Saharan Africa, though a widespread lack of access to information and communications technology (ICT) and a consequent lack of understanding and interest in these tools constitute a significant challenge to their success.

Sub-Saharan Africa: Catching Up with Online Transparency Projects

  1 May 2010

The rise of multiparty democracy in Africa has led citizens and civil society to demand more transparency and accountability from their governments. New technologies can buoy their efforts, but such initiatives face major obstacles including infrastructure, lack of political will, and a shortage of techinical skills and personnel.

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