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· November, 2007

Stories about Angola from November, 2007

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Kuduro: The Sexy Angolan Rhythm With a Message

  30 November 2007

Whether the word Kuduro comes from the Kimbundu language, native to northern Angola and means “location” or from the Portuguese expression meaning “hard ass” or “stiff bottom” is debated but there's no argument that the dance is sexy. As one watches the dancers of this Angolan music style jutting their...

Angola: A blog post from Angola

  29 November 2007

Thomas Gowans writes a letter from Angola: “Living in Angola, I am used to the now thankfully decreasing threat of assault but after over a decade here, I suppose the odds were against me and last week I received a bit of a hiding. Not, as one might imagine, from...

Angola: The right of voting

  26 November 2007

Desabafos Angolanos [pt] is proud to announce the success of a demonstration in November 19, in Lisbon, to claim Angolan expatriates’ right to vote: “Success? With only 20 people?” Yes! Success because they were 20 people under rain, 20 people among 100,000 who had no fear, who did not give...

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Big Brother Africa II: Did Immorality Triumph?

  15 November 2007

Tanzania's Richard Bezuidenhout was recently declared the winner of $100 000 prize for the second edition of Big Brother Africa. Richard, the 24 year-old film student, survived five nominations, fell in love with a fellow housemate from Angola, Tatiana, and was involved in an alleged sexual assault in the house. Richard was newly married when he entered the house. Bloggers have been writing extensively about the outcome of the show.

Angola: The rise of civil society in Angola

  8 November 2007

Koluki blogs at African Path about the rise of civil society in Angola: “The one party political system also meant the virtual ruling out of any civil society organisations, whose space was filled by the party’s so-called “popular mass organisations”, and of any independent media.”

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