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· December, 2008

Stories about Sub-Saharan Africa from December, 2008

30 December 2008

Ghana: Tired of dirty politics

Nigeria: Discussing the Christmas spirit

With the Christmas holidays coming to an end, it is time to collect a few thoughts by Nigerian bloggers on this special season of the year. While some like certain...

29 December 2008

Ghana: Waiting for a President

On December 7, Ghanaians came to the polls to elect a President, but a runoff was necessary. While waiting for the results of that second round that took place yesterday,...

Kenya: Banks should embrace money transfer service M-pesa

Senegal: Domestic workers’ exploitation

Nigeria: Victoriana in African costumes

28 December 2008

Ghana: Election runoff

Tanzania: Friends of Ruaha blog

The Global Twittersphere Discusses Gaza

Twitter is the new blogging, or so the story goes. Never has that been more apparent than in times of crisis: During the Mumbai attacks, Twitter users provided up-to-the-minute coverage,...

Cameroon: Blogging to save 4 year-old from orbital tumor

In November 2008 Cameroon's national TV featured the story of a four year-old boy called Bright Asangwei Fuh suffering from a rare orbital tumor that could not be properly handled...

27 December 2008

Global Health: 2008 Blogs In Review

Bloggers in 2008 showed all the ways in which global health is interconnected with other issues, by covering health stories that touched on everything from poverty and women's rights to...

26 December 2008

Ethiopia: Most popular stories of 2008

Morocco: Condolences to Guinea

DRC: Football match to raise money for war-ravaged Kivu

DRC: A “Gloomy” Christmas in Kinshasa

Cedric Kalonji writes about his "gloomy" Christmas in Kinshasa. With the economic crisis, it seemed like many kinois weren't up for celebrating.

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