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· March, 2007

Stories about Sub-Saharan Africa from March, 2007

31 March 2007

Mauritius: players don't use intelligence

Ethiopia: blog blocked

South Africa: Busisiwe, Rest in Peace

Earlier this month, the South African blogosphere lost a blogger, writer, artist and poet, Busisiwe Sigasa (25). She started her blog, My Realities, at the end of last year with...

30 March 2007

Twits and wits: Malawian bloggers on new technologies, nature, myths, Zimbabwe, and a hard work ethic

Since the last Malawi roundup, the Malawian blogosphere has continued to be abuzz with posts announcing new technologies, news on Internet-based radios, existing radio stations going online, stories about farming...

28 March 2007

Africa: we should all wear sacks and cover ourselves in ash

Africa: Bloggers Differ on Reparations and Apology for Slavery

The Slave Trade Act was passed in England 200 years ago. The act ended slave trade in the British empire. A number of events such as art exhibits, lectures, church...

Madagascar: Growing with China

27 March 2007

Mauritania: Successful Election

France: Line Crossed in the Hunt for Immigrants

(photo via broyez) Here is a sombering follow-up to the post regarding the hunt for illegal immigrants and their following arrests in France. It seems that things have gotten worst...

Sierra Leone: claiming Ishmael Beah

Zimbabwe: living under a dictatorship

Mozambique: mourning after bomb blasts

26 March 2007

Mozambique: Blasts Kill Dozens in Maputo

Photo by Alfredo Mueche, in “Domingo” weekly – March 25, 2007 Mozambique's capital Maputo is mourning the victims of a tragedy that could have been prevented, local bloggers say. Dozens...

Uganda: 2006 Best of Blog Awards

Ethiopia: political prisoner needs urgent medical care

DRC: Angolan troops in Kinshasa?

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