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· October, 2009

Stories about Oceania from October, 2009

28 October 2009

Videos on how Maternal Mortality Affects Communities

Conversations for a Better World

When a woman dies during pregnancy, childbirth or due to complications after delivery, it affects not only the family, but also the whole community.

23 October 2009

Adoption: Securing the Rights of Mothers and Children

Conversations for a Better World

Women speak out from all sides of the issue: adoptees, natural mothers and adoptive mothers try to make sense of the legal, reproductive and human rights issues behind adoptions.

18 October 2009

Australia: Suffer the children

Prime Minster John Howard used border security as one of his catch cries in the 2001 Australian election with telling results. This week his successor Kevin Rudd became embroiled in...

16 October 2009

Global Health: Can Condoms Combat Climate Change?

As scientists and policymakers search for high-tech ways to fight climate change, a proposed low-tech solution is creating controversy -- contraception. A look at the debate as part of Blog...

5 October 2009

ICTs and the spread of indigenous knowledge

The Future of ICT for Development

Practitioners of indigenous knowledge increasingly use the media to exchange ideas and publicize traditional learning to the larger world. What happens when such local practices go global?

2 October 2009

Asia and Oceania: Videos of Natural Disaster Aftermath

Citizen uploaded videos of the flooding, earthquakes and tsunamis that in less than a week, have struck several different countries in Oceania, East and Southeast Asia.

1 October 2009

‘Samoa will remember this day in her heart for ever’

Bloggers and citizen journalists are reacting to the massive earthquake and subsequent Tsunami that struck both Samoa and American Samoa, destroying crops, property and killing an estimated 150 people.

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