· December, 2009

Stories about Morocco from December, 2009

Morocco: Another Blogger Imprisoned

  18 December 2009

On Monday, December 14th, Blogger Bashir Hazzam and Internet cafe owner Abdullah Boukhou were sentenced to four months and one year, respectively plus a fine of MAD 500 (USD 63) each, in a Goulmim court.

Tweets from Beirut: Day Two of the Arab Bloggers Workshop

  9 December 2009

The second day of the Arab Bloggers Workshop kicked off with a presentation about Herdict Web, a site which uses crowdsourcing to gather reports of Internet filtering from users around the world. Qatari workshop participant Muhammad Basheer tweeted a photo from the presentation: Following the first presentation, Egyptian blogger Manal...

Featured Author: Jillian York

  9 December 2009

Jillian York describes herself as "a writer, activist, Internet censorship combatant, and blogger." She is based in Boston where she works at the Berkman Center for Internet & Society on the OpenNet Initiative and Herdict, a crowdsourcing project to identify blocked websites.

Young Leaders from Sweden and Middle East in Dialogue

  3 December 2009

Last month, the Swedish Institute in Paris hosted a meeting of 26 young people from Egypt, Syria, Lebanon, Jordan, Palestine, Tunisia, Morocco, Algeria and Sweden to improve dialogue between opinion leaders in Sweden, the Middle East and North Africa. Global Voices in French was there.

Morocco: Jail for Chakib Khayari

  2 December 2009

Maghreb Blog reports that the sentence of Chakib Khayari, a human rights activist and whistleblower, has been upheld in a Casablanca court. Khayari is set to serve three years in prison for accusing high-level civil servants of aiding in drug trafficking.

Morocco: Celebrating Eid in the Bled

  2 December 2009

This past weekend, Moroccans celebrated Eid Al-Adha. Bloggers in rural Morocco are sharing their stories about this year's celebrations. As Internet access is sparse and often prohibitively expensive outside of cities, many of the people blogging from rural areas are Peace Corps Volunteers (PCVs) and are therefore positioned to give an outsiders' perspective...from the inside.

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