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· September, 2007

Stories about Jordan from September, 2007

Jordan: Help the Needy

  28 September 2007

Jordanian Naseem Tarawnah urges his readers to join a group which aims to help the needy during the holy month of Ramadan.

Syria: Sad State of Journalism

  28 September 2007

Sasa from Syria laments the sad state of journalism in the Arab world, citing examples from Jordan and Egypt in which journalists are jailed and fined.

Jordan: Letter to the Censor

  27 September 2007

Jordanian blogger Hareega writes an open post to the censor here, and sarcastically notes: “We need you here. Our Jordanian blogsphere is polluted with cracked, uneducated, totally rude, unpatriotic, anti-freedom ignorant Jordan haters. I need you here. I need you to teach me to love my country, to watch my...

Jordan: Sad Day for Online Community

  24 September 2007

“The Jordanian government is going on, what can best be described as, an anti-online free speech jihad. A decision has been made to monitor websites (most likely including the rising popularity of blogs) and to keep them in check with the country’s notorious press and publication laws,” writes Naseem Tarawnah...

Palestine: Following God's Rules

  20 September 2007

“When a man follows governmental rules and regulations; people call him a good citizen. He’s patriotic. When a man follows society’s rules and regulations; people call him civilized. When a man follows God’s rules and regulations; people start asking questions,” writes Jordanian-Palestinian Sugar Cubes.

Jordan: How to Force a Marriage

  18 September 2007

Naseem Tarawnah from Jordan links to a story about how a man was jailed for having a relationship with a girl, whose parents turned him away. He set up a tent on a main street, where he had sex with the girl for seven months.

Jordan: The Power of Blogs

  12 September 2007

“Those whose only reaction in life is cynicism and negativism can scoff all they want at blogs and the power of electronic media. But one thing is certain: blogging and other forms of electronic, people powered media can change something,” writes Ahmad Humeid from Jordan.

Palestine: Protesting Violence and the Art of Resistance

  9 September 2007

Protest against Hamas is mounting in Gaza, as Palestinian bloggers and their supporters continue to look for their voices online, writes Shaden Abdulrahman in this round up of Palestinian blogs this week. Also read about how voices are silenced, how children are left to fend for themselves living off trash and how an Arab-American family was treated in Israel.

Jordan: YouTube Solution for Job-Seekers

  8 September 2007

“Nowadays eager job seekers are turning to places like You Tube to tout their marketable skills, prospective employers are reacting positively,” writes Hatem Abunimah from Jordan.

Jordan: Read Sultana

  7 September 2007

Lina Ejeilat, from Jordan, encourages her readers to read a controversial book called Sultana by Jordanian author Ghalib Halassah, whose works were banned in Jordan.

Jordan: MP Attacked

  7 September 2007

Ahmad Ghashmary, from Jordan, writes about how a Jordanian MP from the Muslim Brotherhood was attacked and had half his beard shaved after he spoke out against the Jordanian government.

Arabeyes: Countdown to Ramadhan

  5 September 2007

Ramadhan is a holy month in the Muslim calendar and it is celebrated in all Muslim countries, culminating with a feast or Eid after four weeks of fasting. Muslims are expected to stop eating and drinking, as well as refrain from sex and any 'impure' thoughts, from sunrise to sunset during this month. How are bloggers preparing for this month? Amira Al Hussaini tours Arab blogs to find out.

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