Close

Support Global Voices

To stay independent, free, and sustainable, our community needs the help of friends and readers like you.

Donate now »

· December, 2011

Stories about Egypt from December, 2011

Read this post

Egypt: 2011 in Blog Posts

30 December 2011

The year 2011 is coming to an end, and with all the events took place in Egypt, it is important to list the most important or controversial blog posts of the year. Tarek Amr polls Twitter users to decide this year's top blog posts.

Egypt: A Letter from Maikel Nabil

29 December 2011

No Military Trials for Civilians, a collective blog aimed at raising awareness about the military trial of civilians in Egypt, publishes a must read post by jailed Egyptian blogger Maikel Nabil, who has been on hunger strike for more than 120 days.

Read this post

Egypt: Reaping Legal Victories as the Revolution Continues

27 December 2011

Egyptians are reaping victories in the halls of courtrooms. First, blogger Alaa Abdel Fattah has been released by a judge pending investigations, after spending 56 days behind bars yesterday. Then, a court ruled today that conducting virginity tests on women in the custody of the military is illegal.

Read this post

Egypt: Free Maikel Nabil Sanad – A Prisoner of Conscience

21 December 2011

When Egyptians took to the streets at the start of their revolution last January, their chant “The People and the Army are One Hand!” was heard around the world. Today, after the army turned its guns on citizens, netizens are remembering the words of one blogger who had warned that the army and the people were never one hand. This is the story of Maikel Nabil Sanad.

Read this post

Egypt: Women Rally for Dignity

20 December 2011

Thousands of Egyptian women took to the streets of Cairo today to protest for their dignity, after women were beaten up by soldiers during running battles between the army and protesters in and around Tahrir Square since December 16.

Read this post

Arab World: Global Voices Bridges on Twitter

20 December 2011

As a part of our end-of-year coverage we in the Middle East and North Africa region look back at some of the major events we covered during 2011. The following post highlights the role of the Global Voices Online community in spreading information on Twitter during the Tunisian and Egyptian revolutions.

Iran: Shocking video film from egypt

19 December 2011

Several bloggers have published a video film where Egypt's security forces beating brutally a female protester. Xcalibur with irony writes [fa] now I see why Iranian government says the revolution in Egypt is inspired by Iranian one.

Read this post

Egypt: Women Against SCAF – Who Wins?

18 December 2011

The world woke up today to see that Egypt had made the headlines again with a photograph of military officers ferociously beating a veiled girl and stripping her off her clothes. Nermeen Edrees charts netizen reactions to the way the Supreme Council for Armed Forces is treating women in Egypt.

Read this post

Egypt: Tahrir Square Burning

17 December 2011

Egypt's Military Police have set Tahrir Square ablaze and forcefully pushed away protesters demonstrating outside the Cabinet on the first anniversary of the Arab revolution, sparked by the self-immolation of Mohammed Bouazizi in Sidi Bouzid, Tunisia.

Read this post

Video: Middle East Responds to Media via Webcam

15 December 2011

Talk Back TV Middle East provides a way for people from in the Middle East and North Africa can talk back and give their take on state controlled television and mass media using only a webcam and computer.

Read this post

Arab World: Congratulations Tunisia!

13 December 2011

Human rights activist Moncef Marzouki, 66, has been elected as Tunisia's new interim president today. His appointment, which was followed by a moving acceptance speech, was noted by netizens from across the Arab world, who cheered on Tunisia's progress towards democracy, wishing the same for their countries.

Egypt: Using Twitter for a Healthier Life

13 December 2011

Can Twitter be used to save people's lives or improve their health? Tarek Amr looks at a Twitter account, ran by a couple in Egypt, aimed at increasing health awareness in society, often touching on taboo topics, such as sex education.

Read this post

Egypt: A Baha’i Blogger's Take on the Elections

11 December 2011

The Baha’is of Egypt number perhaps only 2,000 people, but over the years the community has faced discrimination and sometimes hostility. Global Voices Online has spoken to Baha’i blogger Wael about the current situation of the Baha’is in Egypt and the changes that the elections might bring.

About our Egypt coverage


Receive great stories from around the world directly in your inbox.

Sign up to receive the best of Global Voices!

Submitted addresses will be confirmed by email, and used only to keep you up to date about Global Voices and our mission. See our Privacy Policy for details.

Newsletter powered by Mailchimp (Privacy Policy and Terms).

* = required field
Email Frequency



No thanks, show me the site