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· January, 2011

Stories about Brazil from January, 2011

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Brazil: Ministry of Culture abandons Creative Commons

  29 January 2011

Brazilian Minister of Culture's decision to remove a Creative Commons license from its website provoked all sorts of reactions on social networks and among bloggers. It is the first instance of undoing of the previous government inclusive public policies regarding Internet, digital culture and authorial rights.

Latin American Presidents to Follow on Twitter

  25 January 2011

Christian Espinosa in Cobertura Digital [es] ranks the top 5 Latin American presidents with the most followers on Twitter. He also shares other information on the use of Twitter by different Latin American administrations.

Brazil: Neo-Colonialism in Africa

  25 January 2011

Leonardo Sakamoto refutes [pt] the statement of the foreign affairs adviser to the Brazilian presidency, Marco Aurelio Garcia, that “A neo-colonial relationship is only established if neo-colonizer and colonized are in agreement.” For him, it is necessary to examine the complicity of local elites and the situation of colonized countries...

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Brazil: Belo Monte Dam returns to the spotlight

  25 January 2011

The Brazilian government expressed its wish to start building the controversial Belo Monte hydroelectric dam in 2011. Immediately, a virtual mobilization against the project broke out. In spite of the intense flow of information on the Internet and other media, clarifications on the socio-environmental impacts of Belo Monte are still to be provided by the government.

Brazil: Chief of Police assaults man on a wheelchair

  24 January 2011

A physically disabled lawyer was assaulted and threatened with a gun by a chief of police in the state of São Paulo, Brazil, after having complained that the officer had left his car in a reserved parking lot for the disabled, reports [pt] Renato Rovai.

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Brazil: Salary increase for parliamentarians in discussion

  24 January 2011

As every end of the year, the Brazilian federal deputies legislated for themselves and approved another salary increase to approximately 52 times the minimum salary earned by most part of the population. In 2011, the expected ripple effect of wages has been confirmed causing a sparked discussion in the blogosphere.

Brazil: Protest for quality transportation is a crime?

  22 January 2011

While Leonardo Sakamoto wonders [pt] if  protesting for quality transportation is a crime, Conceição Lemes interviews [pt] one of the organizers of the demonstration against the price increase of bus tickets in Sao Paulo, Brazil. The student protester was brutally repressed [en] by police last week.

Brazil: The Brazilian who invented the radio

  21 January 2011

Ricardo Kotscho reproduces [pt] a letter by Hamilton Almeida in which he tells the story of the inventor of the radio Roberto Landell de Moura – a Brazilian priest born 150 years ago (January 21, 1861). According to Almeida, though Landell “patented the radio in Brazil (1901)” it was Guglielmo...

Brazil: Any questions for Julian Assange?

  21 January 2011

Natalia Viana, WikiLeak's journalist in Brazil, invites [pt] bloggers and readers of her blog to formulate questions for WikiLeaks founder Julian Assange until 6pm, on January 21. The most original 10 questions will be selected for an interview to be published next week.

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Brazil: Flooding in the Mountainous Region of Rio de Janeiro Devastated Cities

  16 January 2011

The mountaineous region of Rio de Janeiro is suffering what is being considered Brazil’s most-deadly natural disaster: there are more than 500 fatal victims and countless people left homeless so far. This tragedy, which gives only its first steps in the aid of the victims, still doesn't allow us to assess the damage and the work to be done, but it already brings back the debate about the urgency of creating a policy for climate catastrophes in the country.

Brazil: Police brutality during student protest

  15 January 2011

The blog Vi o Mundo [Saw the World, pt] shares a video by the cartoonist Carlos Latuff and a letter from the Workers Union of the University of São Paulo about the police brutality against students who were protesting in the streets on January 13 against the price increase of...

Brazil: São Paulo annual floods and the biased media

  14 January 2011

Following the floods this week in Brazil, Hugo Albuquerque, from the blog O Descurvo, comments [pt] on the urban problems of the city of Sao Paulo. He also criticizes mainstream media's biased coverage of the issue – the same does Maurício Caleiro, from the blog Cinema e Outras Artes [pt]

Latin America: Women's Political Participation in the Region

  12 January 2011

Figures on the share of seats held by women in national assemblies around the world show that Latin America, “ranks second only to Nordic Europe in terms of the percentage of women elected to parliamentary-level,” as Mike explains in Central American Politics. He also looks specifically at women's participation in...

Brazil: Still the Guerrilla Against Folha de São Paulo

  12 January 2011

Update on GV's post Brazil: Newspaper Folha de São Paulo censors satirical blog: Not happy with the newspaper's Ombudsman accusations [pt], saying that the satirical blog was “coarse”, “appealing”, “insulting” and from “guerrilla fighters”, one of its creators, Lino Bocchini, answers back in the blog Desculpe Nossa Falha [Forgive Our...

Brazil: Does democracy respect its religious minorities?

  12 January 2011

Sakamoto reflects [pt] on the news by Folha de São Paulo about Brazilian president Dilma Rousseff's withdrawal of a bible and a crucifix from her office: “State must ensure that all religions are free to exercise their worship”. The news was biased , as Cris Rodrigues explains [pt] in #dilmafactsbyfolha.

About our Brazil coverage

Fernanda Canofre is the Brazil editor. Email her story ideas or volunteer to write.


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