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· March, 2008

Stories about South Korea from March, 2008

Korea: Roh Moo Hyun Syndrome

  30 March 2008

The popularity of the previous President, Roh Moo Hyun, in Korea seems to become a hotter issue on the Internet. A new terminology, Roh-Ganji (Roh, his family name + Ganji, a slang that teenagers and netizens like to use and its meaning is ‘cool’) is born. His hometown is full...

Korea: Independence Movements in Tibet and in Korea

  20 March 2008

As groups in other countries support Tibetans’ rage and criticize the violence of the Chinese government, Korean netizens are also busy making signature-seeking-campaigns or boycotting the Beijing Olympics. The participants who express their opinions on the internet and put their names on the campaigns are more and more. The reasons...

Korea: Part-time Lecturers and Suicide

  15 March 2008

A series of suicides of part-time college lecturers has been covered in Korean newspapers. Harsh criticisms against universities in Korea are not a few. But some netizens approach this news in other perspectives and it shows how academic jobs can be sometimes viewed.

Korea: Korean Students in the U.S.

  8 March 2008

There are more than 100,000 Korean students in the U.S. It was the main news in Korea the last week. The increase of 10 percent every year helped Korea remain the top student-sending country in the U.S. for a second year, ahead of India and China. Korean students at Harvard...

Korea: Religious Encounter on the Subway

  5 March 2008

Religious issues always generate a lot of opinions from Korean netizens. One person's experience on a subway with a Buddhist monk has gained a lot of attention in the last week on a popular Korean website.

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Japan: The decline of pachinko

  4 March 2008

A staple of the modern Japanese cityscape, pachinko parlors employ a third of a million people in Japan, draw in an estimated 30 trillion yen per year, and entice roughly one quarter of the country's entire population to play at least occasionally, 17 million of them on a regular basis. With plans underway to legalize and regulate casinos in Japan, the status of such pachinko parlors has been put into question, sparking a re-assessment, in comments and blog posts, of the place of gambling in modern Japanese society.

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