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· October, 2008

Stories about East Asia from October, 2008

Taiwan: Protest to defend Sovereignty

China: Rumors and Authorities

South Korea: Homophobia

China: “Criminal” with Human Rights Award

Last week (Oct 23) it was announced that the European Parliaments’ Sakharov Prize for Freedom of Thought has been awarded to Chinese political activist Hu Jia. On the other hand,...

China: To be Dead or Not? Amnesty Appeal for Cop-killer

Scores of scholars and journalists appealed of an amnesty for cop-killer Yangjia, arguing it can be a great time to launch a repeal of death sentence. But opposite voices argued...

Southeast Asia: Impact of Financial Crisis

What are the views of several Southeast Asian bloggers about the global financial crisis? First, an authoritative voice: Malaysia's former Prime Minister Mahathir Mohamad. He points out the double standard...

Japan: Meeting Tatsuhiko Takimoto

Malaysian Media Council: Double handcuffs or media freedom?

Amidst a number of recent journalistic blunders, Malaysia’s Home Minister, Syed Hamid Albar, announced that the government has full intention of establishing a national media policy, together with a regulatory...

Japan: You call that “art”?

Korea: US$100bn Package for Stabilizing the Market

South Korea's government has agreed to guarantee foreign-currency borrowing by the country's banks to help stabilize financial markets. The announcement doesn’t bring positive views from netizens. The netizens also have...

Southeast Asia: Film entries to the Oscars

Malaysia: Era of contaminated food

Working in Brunei

Philippines: 2nd Mindanao Bloggers Summit

Bali bombers to be executed next month

Japan: Top 100 Hot Entries on Hatena Bookmarks

China: Economic Softlanding

China and Taiwan: Zhang Mingqing Incident

China: Shekou 30th anniversary

Japan: The Illegal Download Explained, on 2-Channel

Over the last years, the sometimes raucous nature of the Japanese Internet has repeatedly come under fire over concerns about issues such as harmful content and copyright infringement. Now the...

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