· July, 2013

Stories about China from July, 2013

INFOGRAPHIC: China's ‘Losers’ to Consumers

  8 July 2013

ChinaFile has translated the infographic created by Sohu Business [zh] about the lifestyle and consumption habits of China's ordinary citizens, known as “diaosi“, who are poised to become the mainstream consumers in China. It also hints that China’s underdogs may become the country’s mainstream.

Egypt's Failings Become China's Propaganda

  8 July 2013

Following Egypt's military coup, Chinese State media ran editorials warning of the dangers of copying Western democracy, stating that democracy is not a “universal cure” for the ills that developing countries face. EPOCH TIMES has more details.

China: Statue Built and Removed

  8 July 2013

The Statue of the Soong Ching Ling, wife of Sun Yat-sen, the founder of Republic of China, was appeared in November 2011 in Zhengzhou to mark the 100th anniversary of the 1911 Revolution, was quietly removed. Why? See Beijing Cream for the story.

Breast Milk Popular Among China's Rich

  5 July 2013

Since the 2008 milk scandal in which tainted baby formula poisoned hundreds of babies, China's Southern Shenzhen are enjoying a new nourishment: human breast milk. Wet nurses are hired to breast feed some babies and even adults. Offbeat China has more details.

“Chinese-Style Justice”

  5 July 2013

ChinaSMACK has translated a “one-point” essay from a test-taker at China's annual National College Entrance Exam that took place last month. The critical essay reviewed China's social problems in the recent years, including the rampant corruption and food scandal.

We're Uyghurs. We're not terrorists.

  3 July 2013

Against the background of two violent unrests in Xinjiang, a plea from an Uyghur from Xinjiang stirred up discussions of how to make peace with people from different ethnic backgrounds on Chinese social media. More from Offbeat China.

Riots Spark Ethnic Policy Debate in China

  1 July 2013

While Chinese government is tightening anti-terror efforts in Xinjiang due to the recent Xinjiang riots, an online plea from a Xinjiang native has triggered discussions on the causes of the constant violent clashes between Uyghurs and the Han people. Some netizens think the problem lies in the Chinese government’s ethnic policies. Offbeat China...

About our China coverage

Oi wan Lam is the North East Asia editor. Email her story ideas or volunteer to write.


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