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· May, 2021

Stories about East Asia from May, 2021

Using Clubhouse to counter Beijing-imposed amnesia: An interview with Ai Weiwei

Chinese artist Ai Weiwei continues to fight political censorship in China by using art, sound and social media to maintain the memory of the school victims of the 2008 Sichuan...

Inside Myanmar: Testimonies of survival and resistance

"The military junta could only terrorize our country but they can't rule. They could shoot, kill and arrest our young heroes called 'Spring flowers' but they can't avoid Burma's Spring."

Hong Kong activists sentenced to jail for commemorating Tiananmen Square Massacre in 2020

Hongkongers have been gathering to commemorate the June 4 Tiananmen Massacre since 1990. The court's ruling signals that anyone participating in commemorations this year risks being charged with unlawful assembly.

Two Malaysian artists face police probe for online commentary and artwork

"The persecution of artists such as Zunar and Fahmi stifles creative expression, chills public discourse, and undermines trust in Malaysian authorities."

Women leaders discuss campaign for digital rights in Thailand

'...the government must learn to use technology as a tool to create more positive connections with the people on the ground, not using technology to oppress people.'

Community pantries inspire hope amid pandemic and economic crisis in the Philippines

In a span of less than three weeks, around 800 community pantries have been set up nationwide to help those in need amidst worsening COVID-hit economy, sparking government backlash.

Taiwan, ‘the most dangerous place on Earth'? Not according to Taiwanese.

This week's cover story by the British magazine The Economist labeled Taiwan "the most dangerous place on Earth," eliciting a lot of reaction on Taiwanese Twitter.

China pledges to improve conditions of delivery workers. Arrest of a labor activist suggests otherwise.

Earlier this year, Chen Guajiang, a delivery worker who helped organize dozens of WeChat groups for drivers, was arrested and charged for "picking quarrels." He faces five years in prison.

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