· June, 2012

Stories about Tajikistan from June, 2012

Tajikistan: Is There ‘National Unity’ in the Country?

  30 June 2012

As Tajikistan marks an anniversary of peace accords that put an end to the civil war and brought about ‘national unity’ in the country, blogger Ilhom writes [tj] about his recollections of the war. Another blogger, Jovid Muqim, suggests [tj] that there can be no ‘national unity’ in the country where...

Tajikistan: The Role of Intellectuals in Running a Country

  30 June 2012

Should poets have a bigger say in how the countries they live in are run? Adash Istad writes [tj] that Tajik intellectuals have stayed out of government affairs too long. The blogger argues that it is time for intellectuals to understand that they have a particular ‘mission’ which consists of educating...

Tajikistan: Dushanbe Zoo, from Different Angles

  23 June 2012

If you ever happen to travel to Dushanbe, the capital of Tajikistan, you might think twice before visiting the city's underfunded zoo. Matthew Askaripour, an American student, posted on Twitter a photo of a ‘basically dead’ camel that he took at the zoo. Shocked by the state of the facility, he...

Tajikistan: Blogger Translates Mobile Games into Tajik

  23 June 2012

Tajik blogger Khurrshed has translated a number of popular mobile games into Tajik. Khurrshed explains [tj] that he did the translation in order to make mobile gaming accessible to young people who have cell phones but do not speak English or Russian. Another Tajik blogger recently wrote about the importance of the...

Tajikistan: The Lost Meaning of National Reconciliation Day

  22 June 2012

June 27 is celebrated in Tajikistan as National Reconciliation Day commemorating the signing of the peace accords that put an end to the civil war in the country. Journalist Olga Tutubalina writes [ru] in her blog that the holiday has lost its meaning: “Our ruling clique has not reconciled with its former adversaries,...

Tajikistan: Becoming a Popular Blogger in 11 Steps

  17 June 2012

In an ironic post, Blog Avestiyca explains [ru] how to become a popular blogger or social media user in Tajikistan. The author recommends an 11-step process which includes raising obvious issues, blaming everything on corrupt officials, using smart words, and criticizing those who dare to disagree with your opinion.

Tajikistan: Language and Nation-Building

  16 June 2012

Blogger Adash Istad ponders [tj] the importance of a common vernacular language in the process of nation-building in Tajikistan. The author writes: “We have a national spoken language [which all groups in the country should be able to speak]. Those who do not want to understand this simple truth will...

Tajikistan: Students Sent to the Streets to Greet President

  13 June 2012

On Blogiston.tj, a local blogger writes [ru] about the Tajik president's visit to the city of Khujand in the country's north. To convince the president that people in the city love him, the local authorities have cancelled classes and exams at schools and colleges, sending thousands of students to the...

Tajikistan: Using Films to Promote Inter-Ethnic Tolerance

  13 June 2012

With the government of Tajikistan and Uzbekistan engaged in an ‘undeclared cold war‘ over regional water and energy resources, the conflict also stokes tensions between major ethnic groups in the two countries. A religious group in Tajikistan is using short silent films to teach people about the importance of inter-ethnic...

Tajikistan: Sharia Replaces Secular Law

  9 June 2012

Blogger Kayumars Ato writes [ru] that Sharia, or Islamic law, is gradually replacing secular law in Tajikistan. Excessive red tape and corruption in the country's courts increasingly lead Tajiks to consult Islamic leaders for guidance in disputes relating to marriage, divorce, and inheritance.

Tajikistan: Why There Aren't Many Bloggers in the Country

  4 June 2012

Harsavor (Donkey Rider) explains [ru] why there are not many bloggers in Tajikistan. Most of the country's young people – the group that typically runs blogs – either work abroad or live in rural areas without internet access. And those who live in the cities and have access to the...

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