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· December, 2006

Stories about Central Asia & Caucasus from December, 2006

Kazakhstan: where are we going to be in 15 years?

  29 December 2006

15 years ago we came into existence. I mean – we existed before, but no one knew. 15 years ago after the 1991 August putsch in Moscow, and followed collapse of the Soviet Union, new Central Asian countries, including Kazakhstan, came into existence for the rest of the world (ok,...

Uzbekistan: Russia Moves In

  29 December 2006

At neweurasia, Kamron discusses Uzbekistan's decision to allow Russian military planes to land at the Navoi airport, saying that the government is filling the vacuum left by the expulsion of the US Air Force last year.

Uzbekistan: Religious Restrictions

  27 December 2006

Alisher reports that the new governor of the Andijon province, the site of the 2005 protests and massacre, has imposed new restrictions on Islamic religious practice, including requirements that all restaurants serve alcohol and that children and teenagers not be admitted to mosques for public prayers.

Turkmenistan: Weak Constitution

  27 December 2006

At neweurasia, Peter reports on constitutional amendments in Turkmenistan that both pave the way for acting President Berdymuhammedov to continue in the role and sweep aside any hope that Turkmenbashi's death would usher in openness and democracy.

Azerbaijan: Olympics

  27 December 2006

Carpetblogger throws in a voice of support for Azerbaijan's 2016 Olympics bid, noting all the exciting new events that they could contribute.

Armenia: Parliamentary Monitor

  27 December 2006

Onnik Krikorian has a pessimistic take on the latest developments in the lead-up to Armenia's parliamentary election, saying that everyone might as well just enjoy the show.

Kazakhstan: NurOtan

  26 December 2006

KZblog reports on shakeups in Kazakhstan's political parties that most notably includes merges of parties into the presidential party and the renaming of the party to include a reference to the president's first name.

Turkmenistan: Dust to Dust

  26 December 2006

Peter continues to analyze events in post-Turkmenbashi Turkmenistan. In a recent post, he writes on the burial of the despot and signs of continuity in the new leadership.

Turkmenbashi's Death: Bloggers’ Reactions

  22 December 2006

“The Pres” by Flickr user blogjam Turkmenistan's authoritarian and, to put it lightly, eccentric President Sapurmurad Niyazov died suddenly of a heart attack in the early hours of December 21st. Niyazov renamed himself Turkmenbashi, the Father of the Turkmen, penned a spiritual work called the Ruhnama, which became required reading...

Armenia: Dead Homeless

  21 December 2006

Onnik Krikorian writes about encountering the dead body of a homeless man while walking his son to school. He says that many homeless people die on the streets in Yerevan due to a lack of services to assist them.

Kyrgyzstan: Ala Kachuu

  21 December 2006

Tolkun Umaraliev writes on the practice of bride kidnapping in Kyrgyzstan, noting that the practice is common despite it being illegal. He says that officials are reluctant to do anything about it.

Armenia: Araz Petition

  21 December 2006

Christian Garbis reports on the Araz Petition, an online petition named after an Iranian teenager struck and killed by a speeding driver in Yerevan. The petition aims to pressure the government into making Armenia safe for pedestrians, which Garbis says involves addressing reckless driving and jaywalking.

About our Central Asia & Caucasus coverage

Zhar Zardykhan is the Central Asia editor. Email him story ideas or volunteer to write.

Arzu Geybullayeva is the South Caucasus editor. Email her story ideas or volunteer to write.


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