· October, 2012

Stories about Youth from October, 2012

Colombia: The Conflicting Relationship With ‘The Public’

  8 October 2012

After riots at the campus of the National University of Colombia in Bogotá last week, some students proposed [es] to paint the buildings white to express their rejection of vandalism, prompting a debate [es] about the issue. Andrés Villaveces writes [es] about this and the “conflicting relationship” of most Bogotanos...

Bangladesh: Cleaning Up the Beach

  7 October 2012

More than 300 Volunteers took part in this year's International Coastal Cleanup event in Bangladesh – reports Fahim Alam Khan at Kewkradong Bangladesh blog.

Dominican Republic: Proposal to Toughen Sentences for Minors

  5 October 2012

The House of Representatives has approved a controversial bill to increase the maximum sentences for minors who commit crimes. Although some support the measure, believing it will decrease the delinquency rate, various sectors of civil society insist that this is not the answer to the current wave of delinquency in the Dominican Republic.

Tajikistan: Costly Conscription

  3 October 2012

Blogger Teocrat writes [ru] that the conscription of young men into the military in Tajikistan puts a heavy financial burden on the conscripts’ families and the state. He also suggests that the better educated and more religious conscripts reduce the incidence of bullying in the army.

Brazil: Sany Kalapalo – Young, Indigenous and a Xingu Activist

  2 October 2012

Sany Kalapalo, a young indigenous from the Xingu region, is only 22 years old and is one of the more active voices against the construction of Belo Monte hydroelectric powerplant, in the Xingu river, in the Brazilian state of Pará. Meet her in the first part of this interview she gave to Global Voices Online.

South Korean Voters Call for Longer Poll Hours

  2 October 2012

With less than three months left until the presidential election, young South Korean voters are calling for longer poll hours, clashing with the ruling conservative party. The South Korean poll generally ends at 6pm and lots of young workers, working from 9 to 6 and working under strict corporate culture, have trouble going to the poll. It is worse for six million contract workers whose employment status is always unstable.

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