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· January, 2012

Stories about Technology from January, 2012

31 January 2012

Spanish-Speaking Twittersphere Fumes Over Announcement

Twitter's announcement that it will restrict certain user content according to the laws of individual countries immediately caused a negative reaction in the Spanish-speaking Twittersphere. Twitter users widely employed the...

Costa Rica: Young Entrepreneurs Present Mobile Game

Azerbaijan: #LightYourFire Eurovision Meme

29 January 2012

UK: #TwitterKurds Organize First Social Media Gathering in London

A group of Kurdish Internet activists that have been organizing around the #TwitterKurds hashtag on Twitter have come together for the first Kurdish Social Media Gathering earlier this month in...

27 January 2012

Slovakia: Competition to Re-Design the National Gallery's Site

Côte d'Ivoire: The Story of a Cybercrime Victim

China: Not Worried About Twitter's Decision to Self-Censor

Twitter announced this week that, with an eye on global profits, it has decided to begin censoring content prohibited in the various markets in which the company has users. Although...

Zambia: When Wikipedia Entry “Kills” a President

On the morning of 22 January, Zambians woke up to a statement from State House rebuking news websites for spreading a rumour that President Michael Sata had been assassinated. However,...

Singapore: ‘Ineffective’ Government Online Search

25 January 2012

Caribbean: TEDx Shows “Ideas Worth Spreading”

“Ideas worth spreading.” With this simple slogan, TED.com, which began in 1984 as an annual conference devoted to technology, entertainment and design, has infiltrated the Internet and empowered people in...

Puerto Rico: Vigilance over SOPA & PIPA

Russia: The Fake Political Twitter Account Phenomenon

RuNet Echo

Online anonymity provides perfect conditions for human creativity and humor. In the Russian context this manifests as Twitter accounts belonging either to dead politicians or those that deliberately avoid publicity.

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