· January, 2009

Stories about Religion from January, 2009

Bahrain: Why is God not Saving Palestinians?

  19 January 2009

American Coolred38, who lives in Bahrain, asks: “In your opinion…is it safe to assume…that the millions of prayers sent to God by Muslims asking for Palestinians to be saved and for the genocide to stop once and for all have fallen on deaf ears…but prayers sent out with hopes of...

Jamaica: Praying in Patois

  19 January 2009

Iriegal shares her thoughts on the production of a Patois Bible: “I just want to say $60 million dollars is a lot to invest…there is so much controversy in translating European English into Patois I really don't know how they are going to do it, even from and audio perspective.”

Poland, UK: Abortion

  17 January 2009

Polandian notes that thousands of Polish women are having abortions in the UK: “With it being illegal here in Poland, they are forced to travel to other countries thereby adding bureaucratic hassle and a strange environment/language to what must already be a very nasty and stressful situation.”

Trinidad & Tobago: The Inferno?

  16 January 2009

“Somedays I feel that the effort to constantly be watching over my shoulder and worrying about the safety of friends and loved ones in this small country of just over 1Million people will wear me out”: Trin compares T&T to Dante's Inferno.

Palestine: Israeli Troops Enter Residential Areas of Gaza City

  16 January 2009

Thousands of Palestinians have been fleeing from Gaza City as IDF troops have entered residential areas. A number of the foreign activists in Gaza were helping at Al Quds hospital when it came under attack, and managed to get out reports of what was going on. We hear from them and other bloggers in this roundup of Gaza blogs by Ayesha Saldanha.

Taiwan: Lantern Festival traditions explained

  15 January 2009

The Lantern Festival is held on the fifteenth day of the first lunar month (9 February in 2009). Paul Katz at China Beat explains some of the Lantern Festival traditions in Taiwan. He also notes it is making a comeback in parts of China.

Azerbaijan: Ashura in Baku

  9 January 2009

Joe's Trippin’ posts an extended entry complete with photographs and video of this week's Day of Ashura [See here for earlier coverage] in Baku, the capital of the Republic of Azerbaijan. Although the blog says that the Koran and most Moslem governments ban self-mutilation, a few dozen faithful flagellated or...

Azerbaijan: Day of Ashura

  8 January 2009

Yesterday marked the Day of Ashura, a religious festival commemorating the martyrdom of Hussein, grandson of the Prophet Mohammad, at the battle of Karbala. Often associated with images of flagellation using chains, the day is observed in Azerbaijan, a predominantly Shia but secular Moslem country in the South Caucasus, differently.

Africa needs God?

  7 January 2009

Rombo of What an African woman thinks criticises a recent article by Mathew Parris for The Times UK titled “As an atheist, I truly believe Africa needs God“. And she wonders: “why does everybody assume that no African had ever climbed the mountain before the adventurous foreigner came along and...

Jamaica: Take My Word For It

  7 January 2009

Kadene Porter at Abeng News Magazine is less than impressed with the Jamaica Gleaner‘s New Year tradition of “publishing an exhaustive list of ‘prophetic’ utterances pronounced as the ‘Word of the Lord’.”

Americas: Celebrating the Visit of the Three Kings

  6 January 2009

The holiday season continues across the Americas, even as Christmas and the New Year holiday have all passed. In many countries in the region, the feast of “Los Reyes Magos” (The Three Kings) is an equally important festivity in many households. The day falls around the time of Epiphany and is celebrated on January 6th. Some of the region's bloggers recall the traditions in their own countries.

Nepal Entangled in Temple Row

  6 January 2009

New Year in Nepal is off to a bumpy start. Adding to the energy crisis, the country is now entangled in a row involving one of Hinduism’s holiest shrines -Pashupatinath. At the heart of the dispute is the debate over whether the tradition of Indian priests conducting rituals at the...

Japan: Teaching Buddhism by sign language

  5 January 2009

A blogger at Toppei no Minna Chigatte Minna Ii (トッペイのみんなちがってみんないい) introduces a website where it is possible for deaf followers to download the .wmv files and the original texts of the Buddhist Sacred Scriptures interpreted through the use of the (Japanese) sign language. While this initiative may not sound new...