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· July, 2007

Stories about Religion from July, 2007

India: Holy Bull and Tuberculosis

  31 July 2007

Pickled Politics has a message from a mailing list, on the recent controversy in the UK, when a bull belonging to a Hindu temple was put down after being diagnosed with tuberculosis.

Central Asia: Expert interview

James of neweurasia interviews Central Asia specialist Dr. Eric McGlinchey – the topics of the long conversation include radical Islam, Russian influence, the regime in Uzbekistan, and Kyrgyzstan's development.

Barbados: A Time for Answers?

  31 July 2007

“We have six people dead and, if the talk is true, more than a few others who are barely holding on.” In the wake of the island's tragic bus crash, Barbados Free Press writes, “Barbados deserves answers and the truth, but for now let’s mourn and pray…”

Ukraine: Charity Tennis Tournament

Scenes from the Sidewalk writes about a charity tennis tournament intended for late October: “Our goal is to push the envelope and help the Kyiv community recognize the problems related to street children. We want to show people that these children can be rehabilitated and then create an avenue so...

Bahamas: While We're On The Subject…

  30 July 2007

The banning of laptop computers in the Bahamas’ House of Assembly, the felling of an old tree and the performance of a young athlete are just some of the topics Craig Butler blogs about at Bahama Pundit.

Korea: On the kidnapped Koreans

Robert Koehler at The Marmot's Hole follows up on a series of posts looking at the plight of the 23 Korean missionaries—now on hunger strike—recently taken for hostage in Afghanistan in ‘My personal view on the current hostage crisis,’ an answer to his question: “why would 23 men and mostly...

Sympathy for Christian missionaries

  29 July 2007

After a famous actor who is respected for his morality expressed sympathy for Christian missionaries and the abducted Christian missionaries in Afghanistan on his personal homepage, his webpage was inundated with comments. [k]

India: Deras In Punjab

  27 July 2007

Known Turf goes to Punjab, and takes a look at the “deras” – which were at the heart of a controversy recently.

Turkey Makes The Right Choice

Abdurahman believes that Turkey made the right choice by electing the AK Party. He writes that the “election was widely followed in the Middle East” and that “in the last few years, in every fair election, an Islamic-leaning party won or were denied a clear victory. Hamas in Palestine, Muslim...

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D. R. of Congo: Miracle-peddlars, musical hippos and scary lightbulbs

  26 July 2007

Probably the most consistently interesting Congolese blog is kept by Cédric Kalonji [Fr], whose photographs and commentary bear humorous but often sorrowful witness to the struggles of ordinary life in Kinshasa, the country's heavily populated, run-down capital. Returning from a recent visit to Europe, Cédric found himself wondering whether the...

Egypt: Soccer Counters Terrorism, Blogger Helps Drug Addict, Blogging Egypt's History and More

In this week's round-up from Egypt there are so many intertwined stories. One blogger is asking: what is the relation between soccer and terrorism? We also have an interesting story by Isis, (Egypt-The Reality), who is helping a drug addict because of a blog post. Egypt-Napoleon's history is being profiled in a new blog and can a new fatwa (religious opinion) bring imprisoned Egyptian blogger Karim Amer back to life? There is also a follow up on the 11-year-old mother by Zeinobia.

Bahamas: Is Crime Learned or Innate?

  25 July 2007

“I'm convinced the Parliamentarians let their colleagues pass just in case they need the favour returned should they be tempted to put their hand in the proverbial cookie jar. Could that be the reason we let each other off with petty crimes as well?” Rick Lowe at WeblogBahamas.com wonders whether...

Iran:Religious students and clerics got everything

Ghonabit who lives in Qom,a very important religious city in Iran, says[Fa] there is a real discrimination between ordinary citizens and religious students and clerics. The blogger adds these religious people have their own private buses and some places such as Television Faculty just accept them as students.

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