See all those languages up there? We translate Global Voices stories to make the world's citizen media available to everyone.

Learn more about Lingua Translation  »

· March, 2011

Stories about Refugees from March, 2011

27 March 2011

Japan: Relief Tweets for Refugee Parents

As the situation at the nuclear plant Fukushima Daiichi remains unstable and the government warns about the high levels of radioactive iodine and cesium in vegetables and tap water, infants'...

Côte d'Ivoire: Where Are the African Personalities When They Are Needed?

17 March 2011

Côte d'Ivoire: When Ethnic Hate Shadows Politics

Abobo and Yopougon are two districts of Abidjan, the economic capital city of Côte d'Ivoire. Different ethnic and religious groups have mixed peacefully in the areas, until the recent Ivorian...

11 March 2011

Libya: Sub-Saharan Africans in Serious Danger

The crisis in Libya since the uprisings against Colonel Mouammar Gaddafi has not only had dramatic consequences for Libyans, but also for Sub-Saharan African citizens residing in Libya. Thousands of...

9 March 2011

The Forgotten Palestinian Refugees of Libya

More than 10 percent of Libya's inhabitants are immigrants and among them there are reportedly up to 70,000 Palestinian refugee settlers. As they flee violence in the country, the Palestinian...

7 March 2011

Palestine: Life in the Eyes of Two West Bank Students

Linah Alsaafin and Heba Awadallah are students at Birzeit University near Ramallah in the West Bank, who started a blog together a year ago. Called Life On Bir Zeit Campus,...

4 March 2011

Libya: Death Toll Rises to 6,000, US Mulls Intervention

Human rights groups have put the latest death toll in the Libyan crisis to over 6000, as pro-Gaddafi forces continue to pound opposition-held cities with air strikes. Libyan bloggers and...

2 March 2011

Tunisia: Refugee Crisis at the Libya Border

The border between Tunisia and Libya has seen a massive influx of refugees since the uprising in Libya began. The initial journey is long and tough, and for most it...

Receive great stories from around the world directly in your inbox.

Sign up to receive the best of Global Voices
* = required field
Email Frequency



No thanks, show me the site