· April, 2011

Stories about Protest from April, 2011

Yemen: Millions Protest on Last Chance Friday

Millions of protesters thronged the squares of Sanaa and Taiz in Yemen, calling for the end of Ali Abdulla Saleh's regime. Dubbed Last Chance Friday, protesters are keen to boot out Saleh, who has ruled the country for 32 years. The whole week saw support pumped up for today's massive protests, which didn't fail the expectations of observers.

Bangladesh: Netizens Protest Human Rights Abuse in the Hills

  21 April 2011

Ethnic violence has sparked again in the Chittagong Hill Tracts of Bangladesh between Bengali settlers and indigenous people due to land disputes. The mainstream media have been accused of highlighting the Bengali casualties only and are ignoring the plights of the local aboriginal people. But this time around these minorities have found a voice via blogs and Facebook.

Azerbaijan: Protest to demand journalist's release

  20 April 2011

Mark Grigorian [RU] posts photographs of today's protest demonstration outside the Azerbaijani Embassy in London in support of imprisoned journalist and Amnesty International prisoner of conscience Eynulla Fatullayev. Marking the forth anniversary since his arrest, the blog notes that when the European Court of Human Rights ruled that he was...

South Korea: Search Engine Censorship Claims

  20 April 2011

As South Korea's biggest search engines file an anti-competition charge against Google, net users have started to look back at the various companies' contributions to the Korean net environment. The nation's most visited portal, Naver, has come under particular fire for alleged news screening and censorship of information, along with its monopoly in the field.

Sri Lanka: UN Panel Report Causes An Uproar

  19 April 2011

An United Nations (UN) advisory panel, led by former Indonesian Atty. Gen. Marzuki Darusman, has submitted a report to the UN Secretary-General Ban Ki-moon, in which they find credible evidence that the Sri Lankan military shelled civilians in no-fire zones and sought to silence critics in a brutal fashion, during the war against guerilla group Liberation Tigers of Tamil Eelam (LTTE) in 2009.

Azerbaijan: The ‘Terror’ of Tiny Town

  18 April 2011

Tamada Tales comments on the detention of a small child and her mother at an opposition protest in Baku on Sunday. Captured on video uploaded to YouTube and shared online, the blog wonders what ‘havoc’ could possible be wreaked upon the Azerbaijani capital by the girl.

Ukraine: Kyiv Post Editorial Staff on Strike

  18 April 2011

Democratist writes about the situation with Kyiv Post, an English-language newspaper whose staff went on strike last week to protest the publisher's decision to fire the editor-in-chief over the publication of an interview with the Ukrainian minister of agriculture.

Kuwait: The Prime Minister Wins Again

Sheikh Nasser Al-Mohammed Al-Sabah has broken a new record with his appointment as prime minister of Kuwait for the seventh time in five years. Some bloggers and Twitter users have been campaigning, alongside political groups, demanding his departure. Kuwaiti bloggers speak up, discussing why they need a new prime minister to steer their country forward.

India: Social Media Powers Anti Corruption Bill Campaign

  16 April 2011

On April 5, 2011, social activist Anna Hazare started a fast-unto-death campaign to demand an effective anti-corruption law and hundreds of thousands of Indians supported him. Social media helped spread the campaign of Anna Hazare; netizens analyze why the campaign will never tip into a social movement.

Egypt: Gene Sharp Taught Us How To Revolt!

Last February, The New York Times wrote an article about the political science professor, Gene Sharp, whose ideas were credited as being an inspiration for the Egyptian revolution, as well as many other uprisings in the region. Egyptian netizens respond to the claim with the hashtag on Twitter.

Equatorial Guinea: Few, but Strong Virtual Voices

  15 April 2011

In Equatorial Guinea, where only 2% of the population has access to the Internet, and there are about 11,000 Facebook users and two known blogs. Juan Tomás Ávila Laurel and Eyi Nguema are the only bloggers writing in Equatorial Guinea. For them, blogging is a true commitment with democracy.

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