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· June, 2008

Stories about Politics from June, 2008

Cuba: Waiting in Miami

Ninety miles away….in another country points readers to an article about the cultural milieu of Miami's Little Havana, where old men eat Cuban sandwiches and dream of regime change in...

Cuba: The Church and Gay Rights

The Cuban government's growing support for gay rights is drawing criticism from the island's Roman Catholic Church. Protest is good, says Uncommon Sense, but the Church has it all wrong...

Czech Republic: The Treaty of Lisbon

The Reference Frame writes that “much like in Ireland, the question of usefulness of the Treaty of Lisbon is a controversial question in Czechia, too.”

Bulgaria: More on June 28 Sofia Gay Pride

What's Going Down? writes about the opposition to Bulgaria's first-ever Gay Pride Parade, which is set to take place in Sofia on June 28: “…local right-wing political groups have, predictably,...

Bosnia & Herzegovina: 55 Zaklopaca Victims Buried

Srebrenica Genocide Blog reports that 55 DNA-identified victims from Zaklopaca mass grave have been buried, and posts photos from the mournful ceremony.

Bosnia & Herzegovina: Srebrenica Lawsuits

East Ethnia writes about the lawsuits filed by families of Srebrenica genocide victims.

Serbia: New Government, Almost

A Fistful of Euros announces: “Serbia almost has a government!”

Barbados: New laws

The Barbados Free Press is cautiously encouraged by news that the government promises final drafts of Integrity, Freedom of Information and Defamation laws by the end of the year.

Azerbaijan: Media Concerns

Writing on AFP's Correspondent blog, the news organization's Caucasus Bureau Chief, Michael Mainville, laments the state of the media in Azerbaijan. The post recognizes the pressures and restrictions in place...

Armenia: Eurovision Metal

Unzipped: Gay Armenia comments on rumors that Armenian-American rock band System of a Down (SOAD) are interested in representing Armenia in next year's Eurovision Song Contest. However, there is also...

Ecuador: Constituent Assembly President Steps Down

The president of the Ecuadoran Constituent Assembly, Alberto Acosta, recently stepped down. Many local bloggers are wondering the role that President Rafael Correa and his political party had in this...

Cuba: Exploring Oil

The Cuban Triangle is puzzled by a Florida Congressional delegation's idea that Cuba should be blocked from drilling for oil in its own Gulf waters. He says comments by Senator...

Serbia: Socialist Party Forms Coalition Government With Democratic Party

The Socialist Party of Serbia (Slobodan Milošević's party) is forming a coalition government with the Democratic Party. This means Serbia will continue on its way towards European Union integration. Many...

Guyana: Death of a President

Ruel Johnson's Fictions notes the passing yesterday of Arthur Chung, the first President of Guyana, at the age of 90. He held the post from 1970 to 1980, and was...

Kuwait: White Umbrella Demonstration

Lebanese blogger Mark, who lives in Kuwait, wonders about a protest he saw on his way to work. Demonstrators were wearing white and carrying white umbrellas.

Protest Power in Bangkok

Tumelor writes about the “protest power” in Bangkok, but insists everything is normal in Thailand.

Jordan: A Hushed Up Secret

From Jordan, Naseem Tarawnah writes about a letter “written and signed by a group of ex-politicians, including a past prime minister and head of the GID, Ahmad Obeidat, and essentially...

Korea: Hiddink’s Miracle and Korean Politics.

When Hiddink led the Korean soccer team into the semifinals of the 2002 World Cup he became a hero in Korea. Everywhere – in bookstores and on advertisements – was...

Turkmenistan: Ashgabat Buys Russian Weapons

Peter reports on a Russian arms deal to sell Turkmenistan six BM-30 Smerch multiple rocket launchers.

Uzbekistan: The slain journalist's father calls on authorities

Libertad translates a post about the letter of a father of a murdered journalist Alisher Saipov addressed to the presidents of Kyrgyzstan and Uzbekistan.

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