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· October, 2008

Stories about Migration & Immigration from October, 2008

U.S.: Ivanov for Obama

Massachusetts-based Eugene Ivanov of Ivanov's Report explains why he is voting for Barack Obama.

Serbia: Courageous Mothers

Belgraded contributes an article on what it's like to be a mother in Serbia to the Women's International Perspective, becoming “one of the rare men blogging there.” Showcased in the...

Ukraine: Kyiv's Churches

Pictures of Kyiv's churches – at Nash Holos.

Cuba, U.S.A.: Voting on the Embargo

The United Nations General Assembly yesterday approved a resolution condemning the U.S. embargo. For the seventeenth year running, the vote went in favor of the Cuba-sponsored resolution and bloggers -...

Dominica: State of Affairs

Caribbean Man says that “Dominica isn't a failed state…we are a stagnant state.”

South Korea: National Struggle Day of Irregular Workers

CINA blogs photos of the demonstration on 26 of Oct – the national struggle day of irregular workers.

Guyana, U.S.A.: Making History?

“We may see in the possibility of America’s first Black president the sign of more tolerant times. We may see in the possibility of this particular Black president the sign...

Russia: Migrant Workers and the Crisis

Moscow Through Brown Eyes writes about migrant workers in Russia and the economic crisis.

Jamaica, U.S.A.: Political Differences

Voting on Amendment 8 gets Jamaican diaspora blogger Geoffrey Philp thinking about “the difference between American and Jamaican politics.”

Jamaica: Inaccurate Ranking?

My View of JamDown from Up So writes an open letter to Reporters Without Borders, saying he was “disturbed at the high (press freedom) rank of Jamaica in comparison what...

Cuba: Ties That Bind?

Steven's Cuba Blog and Havana Times report on the formal resumption of ties between the European Union and Cuba, while Child of the Revolution adds: “the Cubans say they are...

Talking to Guyanese litblogger Charmaine Valere

Guyanese Charmaine Valere has lived in the US for over twenty years, but she remains deeply engaged with her home country and its cultural debates via her literary blog, Signifyin'...

Serbia: Asylum Seekers

At Belgraded, a rather heated discussion of Serbian asylum seekers: their true numbers, origins and political views.

Cuba, Jamaica: Press Freedom Index

Diaspora bloggers from Cuba (Uncommon Sense) and Jamaica (My View of JamDown from Up So) talk about where their respective countries fall in the recently-released Reporters Without Borders 2008 press...

Blogging Rural Morocco: Peace Corps Volunteers

Morocco has an active and healthy blogosphere. Bloggers write in Arabic, French, English, Spanish, and Amazigh, covering a wide range of topics and issues. The one negative about the Moroccan...

Jamaica: “Old Boy”

Jamaican Geoffrey Philp is brimming with pride over his alma mater.

Poland: Notes on the Countryside, Politics, Etc.

Sylwia Presley writes about her parents’ village in Poland and ‘golden Polish fall’, among other things: “There is a sense of magic in the fact that Poles do not clear...

Poland, U.K.: “Poles Apart” by Polly Courtney

Sylwia Presley discusses some issues raised in Polly Courtney's novel about Polish immigrants in the U.K., “Poles Apart.”

Cuba, U.S.A.: More than Politics

“Whatever you might think about Barack Obama or his economic plan, doesn't it diminish the suffering of the Cuban people to transform it into a mere debating point in order...

Jamaica: Being Caribbean

Jamaican Geoffrey Philp puts in his two cents’ worth on what “Caribbean” really means.

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