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· December, 2012

Stories about Media & Journalism from December, 2012

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No Haven for Citizen Journalists in Bahrain

  31 December 2012

After Bahrain police “Slap” video went viral the Minister of Interior issued a statement in which he asked that “anyone who films such an event should report it immediately” to the authorities. Two days later, and in contrast with such statements, many were shocked at the news of the arrest of a photojournalist.

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State of Freedom of Speech in Tunisia in 2012

  31 December 2012

In 2012, the battle for freedom of expression continued in Tunisia. Though the internet remained uncensored, free speech advocates voiced concerns over the use of religion as a pretext to curb free speech. Meanwhile, a legal void has characterized the Tunisian media landscape as the government continues to ignore a new press law that protects journalists and limits government interference in media.

Debating Journalism and Censorship

  28 December 2012

In recent days, journalists Sandra Rodríguez Cotto and Wilda Rodríguez [es] have a had an interesting debate on journalism, objectivity, and censorship following the boycott of Puerto Rico's popular TV show “La Comay.”

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Africa's Tainted Global Media Coverage

  27 December 2012

The #Kony2012 campaign contained quite a few over-simplifications about Africa. African media itself is not immune from this sort of criticism either. Here is a summary of the gems, errors and other inaccuracies in media coverage of Africa.

The Personal Lives of China’s New Leaders

  27 December 2012

Xinhua News has published[zh] a series of personal profiles of China's top leaders, including photos of their families, which was rare in Chinese media. The move was seen by many as another indication that China’s new leadership may have a different management style from their predecessors. Offbeat China has more...

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From Gangnam Style to Jailed Tweeter: Korea in 2012

  26 December 2012

Starting from North Korean leadership change, to Gangnam Style spreading over the world and finally the presidential election in December, 2012 has been a dramatic year in South Korea. Here are the top seven Korean stories of the year, which created major social media buzz.

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Police Accuses “2channel” for Assisting in Drug Trade

  26 December 2012

The Tokyo Metropolitan Police Department sent papers on Hiroyuki Nishimura, the founder and former operator of Japan's popular online bulletin board “2channel” [ja] to prosecutors on December 20 2012, accusing him of helping in the solicitation of the narcotics trade, Jiji Press reported. @Ikalga commented [ja] on Twitter that accusing...

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Syria: Negotiating Defection on Twitter

  26 December 2012

Following reports that former Syrian spokesman Jihad Makdissi had fled to the US, on 25 December activist Rami Jarrah, also known as Alexander Page, released private Twitter messages that show Makdissi had been in contact with him for months. This could be, as Twitter users have named it, “the first defection negotiation in history.”

Uzbekistan's Boring TV

  24 December 2012

What's the most boring thing in the world? Waiting for a bus? Attending a philosophy class at a university? Elections in Belarus? No! The most boring thing in the world is Uzbek television!

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Guinean Journalist Mysteriously Disappears in Angola

  21 December 2012

Where is Milocas Pereira? The question echoes through social networks on the disappearance, six months ago, of the journalist and university professor in the Angolan capital city Luanda, where she has lived since 2004. On the Internet a petition directed to the UN High Commission of Human Rights has been launched.

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China Cautioned: “The Internet is Not Outside the Law”

  21 December 2012

On December 18, 2012 China's government backed People's Daily published an article on the front page titled “The Internet is Not Outside the Law”. Most netizens feel disappointed by the cautious note and are worried that there will be more censorship online in the future.

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Former Dictator's Daughter Elected As President of South Korea

  20 December 2012

On December 19, 2012, Park Geun-hye was elected as the next President of South Korea. She is from the ruling conservative Saenuri party and daughter of the former dictator Park Chung-hee. Despite Park's feat in being elected as the first woman president in a largely patriarchal society, young progressives and activists are strongly opposed to Park.

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