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· November, 2006

Stories about Media & Journalism from November, 2006

Mongolia: Fake Hijacking

30 November 2006

Tom Terry has more on Tuesday's hijacking of a plane in Mongolia by government agencies saying they were conducting a drill. One post includes comments from passengers and the government while the other comments on how the media and the government handled the story.

Egypt: English-language news

30 November 2006

Commenting on the new attempt at local English-language news reporting in Palestine (Palestine Times), Matthew Carrington says: “If, as the editor claims, the Palestine Times isn't going to be beholden to any particular political or commercial interest, then this could a good thing. Palestine, as much as Egypt, needs a...

Venezuela: Plagiarizing Journalist Responds

30 November 2006

Journalist Nestor Valecillos, who had plagiarized the post of a Venezuelan blogger, emailed two [ES] of his many [ES] critics to explain himself: “Before anything else, greetings, it's important to stress the fact that we live in a society in which information is found in many and various websites, be...

Sudan: can bloggers save Darfur?

30 November 2006

In a post titled, Can Bloggers Save Darfur?, We Blog for Darfur respond to arguments raised by Mark Jones, the Global Community Editor for Reuters, “We don’t ask for your money, we ask for your attention so that you will be educated as to what’s actually going on in Darfur.”

On Blogging Conflict Regions

29 November 2006

Ethan Zuckerman, one of the founders of Global Voices, once said in an interview that to care about a far away place that gets little media attention requires empathy. Empathy for a place can come through from having close friends who grew there, or by traveling there yourself. Sometimes, it...

Oman: Freedom of press in Oman

29 November 2006

“You can't stop people from writing online. It's easy to regulate the press because 1) the press needs big expensive machines to print newspapers. 2) they need trucks to distribute. 3) they need shops to sell their papers. 4) they need advertisers to pay for all the above. 5) they...

India: Gandhigiri, Hinduism and the Media

29 November 2006

Ambimama reflects on reactions to a popular actor being tried in the court of law under charges of terrorism and a religious leader being tried for murder, drawing links political will, the underworld and the silence of the media. “In North only film industry is controlled by the underworld. But...

Belarus: CIS Scandal

29 November 2006

TOL's Belarus Blog writes about the scandal involving Russian journalists that broke out during the CIS summit in the Belarusian capital. Also, there's a post about the pain the summit is causing to downtown Minsk.

Text Theft in Caracas

28 November 2006

On November 17 Venezuelan architect and blogger, Guillermo Amador, jotted down a post titled “Traffic and Civilization” in which he criticized the Chief of Transit in Chacao [a neighborhood of Caracas] for claiming that the capital city's ever-worsening traffic problem had no solution. “Just because he doesn't know how to...

Sri Lanka: Citizen Journalism

28 November 2006

A new Citizen Journalism initiative GroundViews based out of Sri Lanka takes off. From their About Page – “In response to many requests from INGOs, humanitarian aid organisations including sections of the UN, CSOs, local and international journalists as well as members from the diaspora to have a better idea...

Lebanon: Minister Pierre Gemayel Assassinated

28 November 2006

Lebanon witnessed this week the brutal assassination of its minister of industry and trade. This terrorist act overshadowed all other events and topics in the Lebanese blogosphere. Nevertheless, the posts were as varied and different as the political inclinations of the Lebanese themselves. Here is a sample of what they...

Colombia: TeleSur Reporter Arrested

27 November 2006

The Narcosphere and Western Hemisphere Policy Watch come to different conclusions on the detention of TeleSur reporter Freddy Muñoz by Colombian authorities. Dan Feder of Narcosphere writes: “At the very least, the Colombian government, in allowing the press to discover the accusations against Muñoz has made a very heavy-handed attempt...

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