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· November, 2009

Stories about Literature from November, 2009

Ecuador: Carlos Vega Book

  29 November 2009

In Ecuador, Eduardo Varas reviews the most recent book written by Carlos Vera [es] and its place in the current conflict between the government and the press.

Jamaica, Bahamas, U.S.A.: Copyright Options

  24 November 2009

In response to Jamaican blogger Geoffrey Philp‘s “cautionary tale on the dangers of unregistered creative property”, the Bahamas’ Scavella's Blogsphere says: “This is all very well and good, but I’m not American. I don’t live in the USA. What substitute is there for me?”

Japan: Secondhand books to loose yourself in

  24 November 2009

Photographer Damoncoulter presents some pictures of the Secondhand Book Fair in Shimbashi (Tokyo). In the heart of the Tokyo business district, the fair (held in middle November) was mostly attended by “salarymen” looking for rare pieces of literature to read on the way home.

Guyana: Autobiographical

  17 November 2009

“I've always thought of autobiography as an attempt to leave behind–forever in memoriam–something more or less truthful about one's existence”: Signifyin’ Guyana wonders what the first lines of your autobiography would be.

Africa: Allah is not obliged

  17 November 2009

Sokari reviews Ahmadou Kourouma's novel, Allah is not obliged: “There are three sets of interwoven stories. The story of Birahima and his many wanderings with different militias across the region which makes a mockery of the artificial boundaries created by colonial rulers – only tribes not countries have meaning in...

Malawi: No guts, No Glory

  17 November 2009

No Guts, No Glory is a story from Lilongwe Writers Circle: “First disappointment – no booze. Secondly, it was full of young, enthusiastic, teetotallers – us alcoholic grannies didn’t know anyone. Thirdly, since when was spirituality a requirement for humanitarian interest?”

France: Does Prestigious Literary Award Entail a “Duty of Restraint” ?

  15 November 2009

The start of this year's French literary season saw French-Senegalese novelist and playwright Marie N'Diaye awarded a much-awaited Prix Goncourt. However, N'Diaye and her family moved to Berlin two years ago, in large part because of French president Nicolas Sarkozy's politics. Will this be another opportunity to celebrate diversity in a changing French society? Or will the moment be spoiled by controversy?

Liberia: Too Late for Flowers

  13 November 2009

Too Late for Flowers is a short story by Liberian writer Saah Millimono: “Theresa was in her seventies, lean, gray-headed, with a wrinkled face and almost toothless mouth when I moved into her house as a tenant. She had suffered a stroke that left her right leg crippled and her...

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Japan: Hitler's “Mein Kampf”, the manga version

  13 November 2009

After more than 80 years since its first publication, Hitler's Mein Kampf has become a Manga comic. The 190 page volume, which sold some 45,000 copies in the first printing, tells in a very simple way the story of Adolf Hitler, from his childhood to his rise as the leader...

Cambodia: Comics culture

  11 November 2009

Webbed Feet, Web Log notes that Cambodia had a thriving comics culture during the socialist era but it declined when the country adopted free market principles in the late 1980s and early 1990s.

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