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· December, 2020

Stories about Law from December, 2020

Argentina closes 2020 with historic Senate vote legalizing abortion

"I’ve woken up to see Argentina more free and feminist. No one will ever be forced to give birth again. Argentina is safer for all women."

2020 round-up: COVID-19 in South Asia

The COVID-19 pandemic swamped our coverage in the past 12 months as we highlighted the challenges people faced and the fight against the coronavirus across the region.

New tax on mobile devices threatens digital inclusion in the Democratic Republic of Congo

Critics fear the new tax--the Mobile Device Registry--will reverse the trend of growth in mobile device usage and threaten freedom of expression in the Democratic Republic of Congo.

2020 round-up: How the tragedy of COVID-19 became a success story for the China model

The year 2020 began with the outbreak of COVID-19 in Wuhan. Throughout the year, COVID-19 was the most discussed topic on the Chinese social media.

From COVID-19 to Caribbean literature, this is what the region looked like in 2020

COVID-19 was at the top of the news cycle this year. In the Caribbean, the pandemic exacerbated already existing issues, but also allowed regional netizens to reimagine their collective future.

European NGO uncovers 15-year Indian disinformation campaign

The explosive report by a Brussels-based Non-Governmental Organisation has unleashed a new war of narratives between India and Pakistan.

After years of protests, the Islamabad Zoo will convert into an animal sanctuary

A happy ending for 2020, a year when Pakistanis debated animal abuse like never before.

Citing tweets and op-eds, Hong Kong police charges media tycoon Jimmy Lai with foreign collusion

Documents supporting Lai's collusion charge include social media posts, interviews with foreign media outlets, and meetings with foreign politicians and alleged donations to them.

North Macedonia court rejects lawsuit by journalists over 2017 Parliament attack

Journalists sued the Macedonian state for the violence they faced on that fateful April 27, 2017, when a mob stormed the Parliament. A court ruled they failed to prove the...

Trinidad & Tobago's procurement regulation bill passes, but corruption concerns linger

On the eve of International Anti-Corruption Day, Trinidad and Tobago's Public Procurement and Disposal of Public Property (Amendment) Bill 2020 was passed — by a single vote.

The fight against fake news: A restrictive policy for online freedom of expression in Senegal

In Senegal, the government’s attempts to control fake news raises questions about how to fight against it without infringing on rights and freedoms — particularly online freedom of expression.

Hong Kong suppresses political dissent by freezing bank accounts

Pro-democracy activists believe that the banking system is being weaponized by the national security police to crack down on activists and pro-democracy NGOs.

Singaporean activist who staged a solo protest with a ‘smiley’ placard charged with illegal assembly

"I barely stayed in the area for more than several seconds. Yet, what I did has been deemed as a public protest by the State."

Calls to legislate ‘private hire’ vehicles and stop victim-blaming as another woman is murdered in Trinidad & Tobago

Ashanti Riley was last seen getting into a Private Hire (PH) car, but she never arrived at her destination.

Pakistan to introduce tougher punishment for rape—including chemical castration

The laws address several aspects of the criminal process and include an expansion of the definition of rape, which was welcomed by activists. Other points, however, received mixed reactions.

Hong Kong activists Joshua Wong, Agnes Chow and Ivan Lam sentenced to jail

Joshua Wong tweeted: "We’re now joining the battle in prison along with many brave protestors, less visible yet essential in the fight for democracy and freedom for Hong Kong."

Court ruling gives Trinidad & Tobago green light to deport a Venezuelan minor

After a group of Venezuelans was deported, and then returned to Trinidad under court order, another High Court judge has ruled the state has the right to apply domestic law.

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