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· August, 2020

Stories about Law from August, 2020

Calls for unity as Trinidad & Tobago celebrates Independence Day

"The General Election 2020 flipped Trinidad and Tobago over and exposed what can be described as its ugly underbelly […] laid bare seething tensions that have simmered between ethnicities."

Concerned citizens petition Timor-Leste authorities to drop planned revival of defamation law

"This proposed law is to protect those in power from criticism when they commit any act of corruption and any other acts of crime."

Hong Kong police accused of rewriting history to oppress political dissent

Hong Kong police manipulates narratives of mob violence to accuse political opponents of disturbing the peace and arrest them despite multiple video proofs of their innocence

Why women’s rights and digital rights go hand-in-hand on Namibian Twitter

In Nambia, a Twitter campaign to legalize abortion drew waves of attacks against feminist activists, but as a result, parliament has agreed to discuss Nambia's outdated abortion laws.

From horticulture to Harry Potter cosplay, Thai students find creative ways to protest against repression

Students across Thailand have been organizing protests demanding “an end to the authorities’ harassment of citizens, the drafting of a new constitution, and the dissolution of parliament.”

Islamophobic post on Facebook leads to deadly violence in Bangalore

India experiences another episode of real-life violence triggered by online hate speech.

After recounts revealed the same result, Trinidad & Tobago's government is finally sworn in

After a drawn-out recount which failed to affect the original result, the incumbent government has been sworn back into office for another term.

Indonesian students expelled from school face treason charges for joining a protest on Papua

"Khairun University should support academic freedom and free expression, not expel students peacefully expressing their views."

Is India's digital ID system, Aadhaar, a tech solution for a socio-economic problem?

The world's largest biometric ID system was intended to provide a technological solution to socio-economic problems; instead, it has further ostracised marginal and vulnerable communities.

Human rights defenders and journalists under attack in Southeast Asia

The past two weeks saw several disturbing cases of arrests, convictions, and raids targeting human rights activists and journalists in Thailand, Cambodia, Malaysia, and Vietnam.

In Pakistan, a man accused of blasphemy was shot dead in a courtroom. His killer was hailed as a hero.

Extrajudicial killings of people accused of blasphemy aren't uncommon in Pakistan.

Minister accused of rape gets appointed. What does this say about France?

The appointment to the ministry of the interior of a man under investigation for rape and sexual harassment raises questions on normalization of sexist remarks and actions in France.

Moderate globally, impact locally: A series on content moderation in the Global South

''Even as the platforms have grown and spread around the world, the center of gravity of these debates continues to revolve around D.C. and San Francisco.''

Digital rights remain under threat in Malawi despite historic win for democracy

Will the change in the country's leadership bring about meaningful changes to ensure that Malawians enjoy human rights in the digital space?

Who are the 6 Hong Kong activists wanted by the police under Beijing's national security law?

All of the wanted activists live overseas. One of them, Samuel Chu, has been a citizen of the United States since 1995.

A city shackled: How Beijing’s security law transformed Hong Kong in one short month

In just one month, Hong Kong sees the criminalization of speech, political purges of dissidents, the suspension of upcoming elections and vanishing press freedoms.

Five months after the elections, Guyana swears in new president

After multiple court actions challenging the election's results, the Guyana Elections Commission declared Mohamed Irfaan Ali of the opposition People's Progressive Party (PPP) as the country's new president.

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