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· October, 2011

Stories about International Relations from October, 2011

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China: Questions Following Mekong River Massacre

  30 October 2011

Thirteen Chinese sailors were killed earlier this month in an attack on two cargo ships. Nine Thai soldiers have claimed responsibility, which the Thai government says is theirs alone, but contradicting points in the case have left many with lingering doubts.

Iran: Virtual U.S Embassy

  30 October 2011

America decided to establish a virtual U.S embassy for Iran. In Khodnevis a cartoon says “Imam [Khomeyni]how can we climb up this embassy's wall”. The cartoon refers to Iran hostage crisis where 52 Americans were held hostage for 444 days from November 4, 1979 to January 20, 1981.

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Yemen: VP Hadi Leaves to the US for Treatment!

  29 October 2011

Today's main headline in Yemen was the sudden departure of Vice President Abdu Rabbu Mansoor Hadi to the US for medical treatment. Hadi's absence adds a new snag to the signing of the unpopular GCC deal, which Yemeni president Ali Abdullah Saleh has been putting off for months. Noon Arabia has more.

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Myanmar Netizens to BBC: Apologize Now

  29 October 2011

Some Myanmar netizens are asking BBC to apologize for publishing an ‘inaccurate' map of Myanmar's ethnic groups. BBC has already updated the map but netizens still want a formal apology

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Ukraine: “We Are Europeans”

  29 October 2011

Ordinary Ukrainians are using citizen media and social networks to voice their commitment to European values and organize rallies in support of Ukraine's European orientation. Veronica Khokhlova reports.

Cuba: Internet & Human Rights

  28 October 2011

“2011 will hopefully be looked back as the year when both the right to internet access and the threat to internet freedom were both recognized and tech companies collaborating with human rights organizations set out standards to address the problem and uphold a fundamental right”: Notes from the Cuban Exile...

Cuba: Lessons from Libya

  27 October 2011

“Watching the fall of dictators, one after another, thousands of miles away, we can only reflect on the sequel such a process could generate on our own island”: Yoani Sanchez thinks that Qaddafi's death holds some lessons for Cuba.

“Law Without Borders” Between Brazil, Angola and Portugal

  26 October 2011

Brazilian lawyer and researcher Vanessa Bueno, based in Portugal, launched the blog O Direito Sem Fronteiras (Law Without Borders) [pt] where she gives tips and writes reviews about legal issues, especially for migrants between Portugal, Brazil and Angola. She has also created a group on Facebook aiming to promote debate.

Sri Lanka: Hunger Strike Of Fishermen Families

  26 October 2011

National Fisheries Solidarity Movement (NAFSO) blog informs that members of nine Sri Lankan fishing families from Kalpity have started a hunger strike demanding release of their loved ones from Andaman Jail. These fishermen were captured more than 20 months ago by Indian Navy for alleged trespassing in Indian territories.

Brazil: Journalists Collaborate with US State Department

  25 October 2011

Luis Cezar, from the blog Brasil Que Vai, publishes a paper by Helena de Souza which reports on documents released by Wikileaks that link journalists from the main Brazilian TV network and one of the largest in the world, Rede Globo, with the US State Department.

East Timor: Petition to Keep the Country Debt-Free

  24 October 2011

The Movimento Kontra Deve (Movement Against Debt) and East Timor and Indonesia Action Network (ETAN) have launched a joint petition to “For a Debt-Free Timor-Leste”. The Government of Timor-Leste is currently free of debt. Despite current substantial income from petroleum resources, the government has announced plans to begin borrowing.

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Zambia: Netizens Divided Over Sata's Apology to Angola

  24 October 2011

Since he took over as Zambia’s president after the September 20 election, Michael Sata has committed several diplomatic blunders. The biggest talking point is his apology to the Angolan government for former Zambian ruling party MMD's support of the then Angolan rebel movement.

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