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· February, 2011

Stories about Ideas from February, 2011

13 February 2011

China: Farewell to all Mubaraks!

"Illegitimate regimes," writes Chinese novelist Yang Hengjun of Hosni Mubarak, "end up illegitimate, no matter how many impressive reasons you put forward, no matter how smooth-tongued you are, no matter...

11 February 2011

Tunisia: What Follows the Revolution?

President Zine al-Abidine Ben Ali fled to Saudi Arabia more than three weeks ago, but clashes with police and protests by people demanding jobs or better wages are still taking...

7 February 2011

Cuba: Who Does The Law Protect?

Jamaica: Social Media is the Message

Jamaica: Lessons from Marley

Egypt: Tahrir Square's Mini Utopia

There is another side to the ongoing revolution in Egypt, which is the daily life of those people sitting in on Tahrir Square. For the past 12 days, they have...

Jordan: Proud to be an Arab

Cambodia: Review of Tedx Phnom Penh

Tedx Phnom Penh conducted its first event in Cambodia last February 5 with the theme “Building the Future”. Here are some blog and twitter reviews of the event

5 February 2011

Global: Thoughts on interfaith harmony and world peace

In this, the first, World Interfaith Harmony Week, people from all faiths have been getting together to forget about differences and promote religious tolerance and dialogue based on the mantras...

China: The coming of age of Political Confucianism?

The unveiling of the Confucius statue in Tiananmen Square last month has renewed the debate about Political Confucianism as the state ideology of China.

A Visual Glance At the Gov. Censorship Around the World

4 February 2011

Cuba: Pacheco Blogs From Exile

China: Internet service as a social contract

What do Chinese netizens think is more likely to spark a new political movement in China: Facebook, a Joe Lieberman-style Internet kill switch, or widespread corruption, inflation and human rights...

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