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· April, 2006

Stories about Ideas from April, 2006

China: Staring happens

Laowiseass‘ Lalaoshi blogs out the reasons why he gets stared at in some places and passed over in others: “I remember no one stared at me in Zhumadian, a Henan...

Hong Kong: Benefits blogs bring

More meta-commentary from Roland at EastSouthWestNorth in ‘Why Blogs Are Better Than Mainstream Media‘.

Taiwan: English teaching essentials

Mark at Doubting to shuō blogs critically on what separates good ESL teachers in Taiwan from the bad. “Obviously,” he writes, “this is pretty subjective.”

Japan: Bush photo mocked

Blog of the Riding Sun‘s Gaijin Biker has a caption contest for a photo of American president George W. Bush pulling on the arm of Chinese president Hu Jintao's suit...

China: Red but greening

In ‘Is China Going Green, Part VIII?‘, China Law Blog‘s Dan Harris relates a Wall Street Journal story on increasing environmental awareness in the rapidly-developing Asian country to his own...

China: Intellectual property law

Kevin Fisher at chinablawger takes a legalistic look at the glamorous side of intellectual property law.

China: Photoblogs—translation not needed

In the write-at-your-own-risk world of blogging in China, there are no fine lines between what's acceptable, what will get you blocked and what will get you thrown in jail. Lists...

China: America's oil foe

China Confidential‘s Confidential Reporter continues to make the case that China and the United States are locked in a race to the bottom of the world's oil barrel. “Like a...

Japan: Creative manhunt methods

The An Englishman in Osaka blogger posts on the unique way Japanese police track down their most wanted.

DRC: Informal vs. Official World Order

UDPS Liege contrasts (FR) the official world order (UN and other international bodies) to the informal world order (multinational corporations and secret service agencies). According to the informal world order,...

Vietnam myths uncovered

Preya at Dreaming of Hanoi tackles some of the myths people have about Vietnam.

Haitian Blogger Yon Ayisyen: “I'm No Revolutionary Hero”

Yon Ayisien (whose name means “A Haitian”) blogs at Ayisyen Sa Nap Regle? (“What's Up Haitians? ” in Creole) and might as well be renamed HaitiPundit. He is the only...

Taiwan: Regional aggregator coming

Prominent Taiwanese blogger Portnoy has started an English-language blog, Portnoy in Between. First up? Time to see a Chinese-language blog aggregator. “It is nothing about English hegemony;” he writes of...

Bloglogue: US Dollars & Democracy in Iran!

Bloglogue’s first issue was about Iran in Media and several bloggers & non bloggers from different countries took part in discussion. Second issue is about a very hot issue: US...

Iran: Cartooning the nucelar crisis

In Point of View blog, we can discover several cartoons created by Sakhvarz, an Iranian cartoonist & blogger, about the ongoing nuclear crisis.

Helping Russian Orphans

On March 19, a group of wonderful, kind people from Moscow took presents acquired on donations from ordinary Muscovites to an orphanage in Ivanovo, home to 122 children (o to...

Iran: Nuclear & Safety

Inja va Aknoun (means Here & Now) writes about nuclear technology & security related questions (Persian). He says nobody in Iran talks about the safety of people who live in...

Mexico: Learning Freedom

Leon Felipe Sanchez introduces the new weblog, Aprender la Libertad (Learning Freedom) (ES), which he is co-authoring with Ariel Vercelli (ES). The blog continues themes from a book by Vercelli...

China: U.S. relations analyzed

The opening editorial for this week's issue of the Chinese-language, internet-based, international politics-analyzing Far & Wide Journal takes a quick look at the diplomatic buildup to Chinese president Hu Jintao's...

China: Race for oil

“[B]y 2020,” writes the China Confidential blogger-reporter, “the world's most populous nation will have to import 70 percent of its oil. Soaring demand for oil is certain to be accompanied...

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