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· November, 2007

Stories about Humor from November, 2007

Brazil: War in Rio

  29 November 2007

The blog War in Rio, o Jogo [pt], which defines itself as “a manifest game and a bad taste joke”, has been quickly gaining popularity. Inspired by Wargaming, the idea behind the project is to use humor to generate a debate about the situation in Rio de Janeiro: “While politicians...

Guyana: Chit-Chat

  29 November 2007

According to Guyana-Gyal, chatting, or “gyaffing” is “what we live for here…and cellaar-phones ring in the best thing for extra-communication in my lovely native land.”

China: New Idiom

  29 November 2007

Doublleaf suggests a new idiom “Zheng Long Pai Hu” (zh). Its literal meaning is Zheng Long taking the tiger photo and its extended meaning is someone doing forgery for interest group to cheat the public. Even the case is exposed the person still insists the forgery is the truth.

Russia: Peter Nalitch

  29 November 2007

Siberian Light writes about Peter Nalitch, Russia's “homegrown star to match Borat”: “Seriously – who could resist the charming Nalitch as he croons “Gitarrr, Gitarrr, Gitarrr, jump to my yaguarrr, Gitarrr, Gitarrr Gitarrr, come to my boudoirrr” from the front seat of his cramped Soviet Kopeika car?”

India: Noise and Gods

  26 November 2007

The din of Hindu festivals doesn't quite find cheer with Chronicus Skepticus, who wonders if the Hindu gods are deaf as posts.

China: Loong not Dragon

  21 November 2007

Lanzhou city urged to standardize the translation of Chinese dragon into “Loong” as the two words convey very different imagine. Zishuo suggests to translate the word into “Yoooooog” as the word carries the horns, reflects the length and shows the tails of the Chinese dragon.

Armenia: Dark Years

  20 November 2007

Zarchka at Life Around Me says that former president Levon Ter Petrosian will always be synonymous with the days when Armenia had frequent power cuts. Indeed, she notes, rare power outages in the capital are now jokingly linked to Ter Petrosian's plans to contest next year's presidential election.

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