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· August, 2021

Stories about Human Rights from August, 2021

Digital Campaign in Bangladesh gains momentum as women speak up against misogyny

A feminist grassroots network in Bangladesh has started an innovative campaign on Facebook to protest the media trial, moral policing and sexist language in covering women celebrities.

Train attack in Japan exposes misogyny and gender violence

"The common trait among mass shooters, serial killers, and other serial perpetrators of gendered violence is an intense hatred of women."

#KeepItOn: How the Twitter ban is affecting young Nigerians 

Twitter is a connected public square for many young Nigerians. The ban is taking a toll on their businesses, advocacy, and social life. 

Namibian female sprinters are victorious at World Under-20 Athletics Championship amidst bans over discriminatory tests

In April 2021, the World Athletics introduced new rules for female classification which banned four athletes — all from Africa — from participating in the 800m race.

As Ebrahim Raisi begins his presidential role, oppression is set to soar in Iran

Iran's former Chief Justice and head of the regime's judiciary apparatus won the presidential election on June 19 in a landslide victory.

Little chance of justice for Colombia's murdered journalists

Only one out of 161 murders of journalists resulted in a conviction of all perpetrators.

Facebook user gets 18-month prison sentence for mocking Cambodia’s prime minister

"This verdict is a message that makes those who have constructive ideas or criticisms in relation to social issues be fearful and hesitant and will limit their freedom of expression."

Earth Defenders Toolkit launched to help communities navigate digital tools for defending environmental rights

Launched in July 2021, the toolkit aims to enable grassroots environmental protection communities to find and use the resources most helpful to them without seeding their dependence on external support.

Protestors call for the resignation of Thailand's Prime Minister Gen Prayut

Since last year, protestors have been calling for the resignation of Prime Minister Gen Prayut who came to power through a coup in 2014.

Cambodia’s China-funded mega dam linked to rights abuses and loss of fisheries

"Today, everything the dammed-up rivers provided – food, water, an income from fishing – is gone."

The plight of Afghan women under the new Taliban regime 

With the Taliban taking control of Kabul, women in Afghanistan are faced with the bleak prospect of a return to a society that denies their rights.

Space for peaceful protests is vanishing in Hong Kong as pro-democracy coalition is disbanded

Throughout its tenure, the umbrella organization frequently hosted major mass rallies in Hong Kong, including the 2019 anti-China extradition protests.

Anti-immigrant sentiment leads to violence in Turkey

A mob ransacked and vandalized stores, homes, and cars belonging to Syrian immigrants in Ankara's Altindag neighborhood.

Japan's ‘Battleship Island’ hides history of wartime forced labor

"Very little of Japan's history of industrialization presented at their new UNESCO Heritage sites is true."

LIVE on August 25 (in Spanish): How COVID-19 fueled the protests in Cuba, Guatemala and Colombia

From Cuba to Colombia to Guatemala—countries with very different political contexts—people have taken to streets in recent times to demand change. What do these countries have in common?

With attacks on Ukrainian activists on the rise, civic pressure is key to ensuring justice

Harassment and attacks against civic activists in Ukraine are on the rise, say human rights defenders. Anti-corruption work, environmentalism, and LGBT rights remain the most dangerous spheres of activism.

The Chinese government drives support among ambassadors of Muslim countries for the Uyghur genocide

Ignoring data collected over the years by activists and testimonies by former inmates of Xinjiang "re-education camps," ambassadors from Muslim countries peddled the official Chinese line during a staged interview.

An eight-year-old boy is the youngest person ever accused of blasphemy in Pakistan’s history

An eight-year-old Hindu boy has become the youngest person ever to be charged under Pakistan's blasphemy laws after he intentionally urinated in an Islamic religious school library.

After Dutch Literary Prize winner says Suriname ‘needed’ former president Bouterse, organisers cancel her award ceremony

In 2019, Dési Bouterse, who first came to power in a coup, was sentenced to 20 years in prison after he was convicted for the execution 15 dissidents in 1982.

Supporting witnesses: First step towards ending impunity for war crimes in Bosnia and Herzegovina

"What is often overlooked is the most important precursor to ending impunity: a secure environment in which survivors can testify, free from intimidation, severe retraumatization, and threats of physical harm."

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