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· February, 2011

Stories about Health from February, 2011

Haiti: Preventable Suffering

  28 February 2011

“The earthquake did not kill people. Bad buildings killed people. Lack of medical care killed people. Lack of infrastructure killed people. Lack of caring government officials kill[s] people”: Dying in Haiti is convinced that “most Haitian suffering is not necessary and is preventable in the first place.”

Cuba: Zapata Vive

  24 February 2011

“The fact that Zapata’s death came about through starvation is one more piece of the hunger we have endured for over half a century”: Crossing the Barbed Wire explains why Orlando Zapata Tamayo's death “was not in vain”.

Haiti: Can News Ever Be Impartial?

  23 February 2011

“We have to remember that news – that holy, sacred source of information – is biased”: Throwing Down the Water reminds us to ask a few pertinent questions – “Whose story is being told? Through which eyes? For whose benefit?” – when sifting through the news.

Cuba: The Memory of Zapata

  23 February 2011

“Sometimes the end of person cements his name in history forever”: Generation Y blogs about Orlando Zapata Tamayo on the first anniversary of his death.

Jamaica, Haiti: Insensitive Treatment?

  22 February 2011

“The Haitians are clearly hurt and humiliated” over the treatment of its youth football team, writes Active Voice, some of members of which were found to be suffering from malaria.

Cuba, Trinidad & Tobago: The Gay Agenda

  21 February 2011

Could prioritizing the gay agenda be diverting attention from more pressing issues? Iván's File Cabinet explores the possibilities, while gspottt says the Trinidad and Tobago government “has its priorities on GLBT issues wrong.”

Bhutan: More On Tobacco Ban

  18 February 2011

“Now smoking has become one fear and guilt -ridden expensive habit,” thus explains Penstar the impact of the tobacco ban in Bhutan.

South Korea: Dead livestock draws a flocks of vultures

  18 February 2011

South Korea's citizen media, Wiki Tree posted Twitter @Photomaker79's image of a flocks of vultures circling over a burial ground in Kyunggi Province, where dead livestock have been dumped. To slow down the country's worst foot-and-mouth disease outbreak, the government culled near a quarter of its herd and buried them...

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Bahrain: Protests Erupt at Salmaniya Hospital

  17 February 2011

Chaos has hit Bahrain's Salmaniya Hospital, the country's largest public hospital, after Thursday pre dawn police raid on protesters in Lulu Roundabout. Doctors had to protest to be able to provide emergency care to those injured. Read on to see what happened there.

Russia: Recreating a Traditional Village Hospital

RuNet Echo  16 February 2011

Mikhail Shlyapnikov (LJ user michael-077) writes in detail (RUS) about plans to set up a communal village hospital – old-style, but functional – in Kolionovo, Moscow region: “This, perhaps, is a rare case in contemporary history of rural Russia when, contrary to the general tendency, a village hospital is not...

South Korea: Blood exuding from the ground where culled animals are buried.

  15 February 2011

South Korea had lost a quarter of the herd from its worst foot-and-mouth disease outbreak. Fears among Koreans grow as experts anticipated the blood from culled animals may contaminate nearby underground water and soil. Twitterer @Hyeyounga posted a gruesome photo of blood exuding from the burial ground and running over...

About our Health coverage

Juhie Bhatia is the Global Health editor. Email her story ideas or volunteer to write.


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