· June, 2010

Stories about Freedom of Speech from June, 2010

Vietnam: Law requiring surveillance app in Internet Cafes

  17 June 2010

Xeni Jardin over at boingboing has written a new post about new legal requirements for surveillance in Vietnam's internet cafes. Citing a recent PC Mag article and a recent entry at Google's Public Policy blog, she states that “a new law in Vietnam law requires all “retail Internet locations” to...

Guyana: Free to Criticize

  16 June 2010

Diaspora blogger Stella Ramsaroop republishes a column she wrote for a Guyanese newspaper in which she says: “If the people of Guyana want to continue down the road of true democracy, then it is time to tell your government to back off the nation’s free press.”

Russia: Online Media Exempt From Comments Responsibility

Russian Supreme Court finally approved the decision concerning responsibility of online news media for the comments published on their forums, lenta.ru reported [RUS]. The court exempt the news websites from any responsibility for comments left by the users. However, Roskomnadzor [RUS], Internet regulatory body, has the authority to oblige site...

Cuba: Letters to the Editor

  14 June 2010

Generation Y says that the Granma newspaper's “Letters to the Editor” section “has created the false impression that criticism is admissible and one can speak with ‘no holds barred’.”

Bangladesh: That Facebook Girl

  14 June 2010

Aminul Islam Sajib was supposed to meet a girl he befriended at Facebook on his birthday. But the Bangladesh government slapped a Facebook ban. Read what happened next.

Bulgaria: Protest Against Neo-Nazi Violence

On June 6, a protest was held in Sofia in support of the rights of refugees and immigrants in Bulgaria. Shortly before the start of the protest, a group of skinheads attacked several people inside a tram on the way to the event. On June 10, a second gathering was organized, in which activists protested against neo-Nazism and the attacks on peaceful citizens.

Armenia-Azerbaijan: Conflict Voices

In the 16 years since a ceasefire agreement put the conflict between Armenia and Azerbaijan over the disputed territory of Nagorno Karabakh on hold, successive attempts to broker a final peace have faltered. Could blogs and other online tools now offer alternative voices the opportunity to have their opinions on the conflict heard?

Belarus: 200 Meters of Gay Pride in Minsk

“Insider’s view from Belarusian Gay Pride March” – at Belarus Digest: “Two nights in the police department seemed an eternity for us. So now when I’m free I can’t keep it to myself. I don’t appear to have any freedom of speech in my country, but I have the freedom...