· July, 2013

Stories about Freedom of Speech from July, 2013

Trinidad & Tobago's Media Association Pulls a 180 in Press Freedom Debacle

  14 July 2013

The Media Association of Trinidad and Tobago has retracted its original statement about political interference having a part to play in the alleged reassignment of key reporters in the Guardian's newsroom, leaving some bloggers wondering if the whole affair was a storm in a teacup…or if the public is not being told the whole story.

Teen Activist Malala Yousafzai Impresses UN, Polarizes Pakistan

  14 July 2013

Malala Yousafzai, the Pakistani activist who was shot by the Taliban on her way to school less than a year ago, celebrated her 16th birthday by delivering a powerful speech to world leaders at the United Nations headquarters in New York. A symbol for child education and women empowerment around the world, some in Malala's country Pakistan continue to spin conspiracy theories to malign her.

New Internet Law in The Gambia Puts Gag on Government Criticism

  12 July 2013

Parliamentarians in the tiny West African state of the Gambia have ratified and passed a new law that seeks to tighten laws on Internet freedom. The law seeks to punish “instigating violence against the government or public officials”, and also targets individuals who “caricature or make derogatory statements against officials” or “impersonate public officials”.

Press Freedom Déjà Vu in Trinidad & Tobago

  11 July 2013

All anyone seemed to be talking about today in Trinidad and Tobago was the walkout at the Guardian newspaper and whether there is more in the mortar than the pestle. Many bloggers are making the point that this isn't the first attempt at silencing journalists in the country.

Cambodia Elections: The Facebook Vote

  11 July 2013

Cambodian netizens are actively using Facebook to discuss, debate, and share updates about the July 28 National Assembly elections. Meanwhile, political parties are also maximizing the popular social networking site to reach out to younger voters.

Grenada: Electronic Media Ignorance?

  10 July 2013

Grenada's controversial Electronic Crimes Bill will be debated today in Parliament, but Blah Bloh Blog is “at a loss as to how they are going to establish such legislation…given the very well-known fact that literally NO ONE in the government…knows anything about computers, the internet, electronic communications or social media.”

Protests Erupt in South Korea Over Spy Agency's Electioneering

  5 July 2013

Protests have continued for several weeks in South Korea against the state secret agency’s electioneering. Nine agents from the National Intelligence Service (NIS) created hundreds of Internet IDs and wrote more than 5,000 posts on the Internet and used some of them to attack domestic opposition parties and their candidates ahead of South Korea’s presidential election last December.

How Edward Snowden Divides Russians

When Edward Snowden left Hong Kong for Moscow, it placed Russia at the center of what had primarily been an American story. For Russians, his prolonged stay in Sheremetyevo has turned the question of what should be done with him from academic to practical, as his fate now rests largely in Russia's hands.