Close

Support Global Voices

To stay independent, free, and sustainable, our community needs the help of friends and readers like you.

Donate now »

· July, 2009

Stories about Freedom of Speech from July, 2009

Cuba: Political Prisoners

  31 July 2009

Cuban diaspora blogger Uncommon Sense reports that while one former political prisoner has started a blog, another Cuban human rights activist “faces up to 8 years in prison if convicted of trumped-up charges of assault and receiving stolen property.”

Trinidad & Tobago: Media Meekness

  31 July 2009

B.C. Pires recalls a radio show he used to host in the context of falling journalistic standards in Trinidad and Tobago: “From that thin end of the wedge we have reached this stage, where the Prime Minister can make the most foolish statements completely unchallenged – and the Media Association...

Trinidad & Tobago: PM vs. the Media

  30 July 2009

As the Prime Minister of Trinidad and Tobago declares that the media is against him, KnowProSE.com says: “My olive branch for the Prime Minister would be, ‘You fix the government, we'll fix the media.’ But the point is that he isn't fixing the government…”, while This Beach Called Life sums...

Belarus, Russia: Bloggers React to Graphic Chechen War Video

On July 3, Belarusian blogger Tatsiana Elavaya posted a provocative video showing the assassination of captive Russian soldiers by Chechen guerrillas during the 1999 war in Chechnya. The video had been available elsewhere before, but when Tatsiana posted it on her blog, the reaction of the Cyrillic blogosphere was unprecedented.

Haiti: What Happened to Pierre-Antoine?

  29 July 2009

“July 28 marks the 94th anniversary of the US occupation of Haiti…August 12th will mark the second anniversary of the disappearance of Lovinsky Pierre-Antoine”: The Haitian Blogger wonders what has happened to this leading human rights activist.

Trinidad & Tobago: Mother Earth

  28 July 2009

“It’s not how many tractors you have or how much oil you drill or how many smelters you build. But the humanity and the humility of what you do with your knowledge and your resources”: Trinidadian blogger Attillah Springer fears that we will pay for the “gross and sloppy mishandling...

Russia: Mourning Natalya Estemirova

A Step At A Time translates LJ user kutuzov‘s comment “on the political background to Natalya Estemirova’s murder” and links to Prague Watchdog's photo report on “the vigil-cum-rally that was held in Moscow on July 23 to remember the murdered human rights activist.” Oleg Kozlovsky writes about and posts a...

Azerbaijan: Smashing idealism

Thoughts on the Road comments on the English translation of an interview with the official investigator on the case of recently detained video bloggers Adnan Hajizade and Emin Milli posted on the OL! blog. The blogger says that he still considers the case against the two youth activists to be...

Read this post

Malaysia: “Where is democracy?”

  26 July 2009

Malaysia's Prime Minister celebrated his 100th day in office two weeks ago. But many of his constituents chose to mark the event by launching the “Where is democracy?” campaign. The 711whereisdemocracy blog was set-up encouraging Malaysian bloggers to support the internet protest.

Maldives: Journalists at Risk

  26 July 2009

At least three journalists in the Maldives have been subjected to either physical or verbal abuse and psychological intimidation within a span of the last 10 days. The recent cases of intimidation and abuse against journalists by various groups in the society indicate that journalists are still at risk in Maldives.

Egypt: “Fifty-seven years after the coup and we still are not able cope”

On the 57th anniversary of their revolution, Egyptians are still evaluating and debating how this historic event that started with the military coup d’etat has changed the their lives, and that of many future generations. Until today, bloggers continue to discuss and pinpoint the pros and the cons of the revolution, as well as the decisions of the Free Officers, who led the coup which turned Egypt from a constitutional monarchy to a republic.

Read this post

Morocco: A Decade with Mohammed VI

When in July 1999, king Mohammed VI of Morocco ascended to the throne, the expectations for change and progress were such that many international observers foresaw an albeit difficult but inexorable march that would lead the country to a prosperous, liberal and democratic future. Ten years later, many bloggers and online news websites commemorate the first decade of the reign of Mohammed VI with hope for a better tomorrow.

Cuba: Political Arrests

  24 July 2009

Diaspora blogger Uncommon Sense links to a report that claims “there were 130 political arrests” in Cuba in the month of June.

Azerbaijan: Fighting mirrors

Fighting windmills? Take a pill. recounts various events that have happened to Azerbaijan's youth movements in the past few months, including the detention of dozens of activists. The blog says that tomorrow a new initiative will be established to protect their rights.

Hungary: The Hungarian Guard Banned

A paramilitary association called the Hungarian Guard was banned at the beginning of July after more than a year of investigation by Budapest Court. Guard members and supporters held spontaneous and officially organized rallies in Budapest to save the organization.

Receive great stories from around the world directly in your inbox.

Sign up to receive the best of Global Voices!

Submitted addresses will be confirmed by email, and used only to keep you up to date about Global Voices and our mission. See our Privacy Policy for details.

Newsletter powered by Mailchimp (Privacy Policy and Terms).

* = required field
Email Frequency



No thanks, show me the site