· July, 2012

Stories about Ethnicity & Race from July, 2012

Colombia: Film on the Afro-Colombian People in Theaters in August

  12 July 2012

The Colombian movie Chocó, on the life of an Afro-Colombian family in the coastal region of Chocó, which opened the Cartagena International Film Festival and was presented in the Berlinale earlier this year will finally reach theaters in Colombia this following August 3rd.  Watch the trailer here.

Guyana: Editorial Ethics

  10 July 2012

Ruel Johnson responds to a recent controversial Guyana Chronicle editorial which asserted that black youth in Guyana were socialised to be resentful of Indians : “First of all, editorials are the highest form of journalism and basic journalism calls for the citation of sources of information – generalisations in editorials therefore usually point to...

Kyrgyzstan: Caught Between Nationalists, Court Fines Journalist

In a controversial case, a court in Kyrgyzstan has fined Vladimir Farafonov, an ethnic Russian journalist, for publishing articles that allegedly incite national hatred. Netizens are divided in their assessment of the court ruling. While some believe that the journalist deserved a harsher punishment, others argue that the verdict sets a dangerous precedent.

Russia: Caucasus Stereotypes in Film

Global Chaos comments on a recent video report by Radio Free Europe examining changing stereotypes of the Caucasus in Russian cinema. The blog asks whether the caricatures often adopted for public diplomacy purposes are counterproductive or not.

Guyana: Being Black

  9 July 2012

Imran Khan addresses the issue of racism in Guyana, saying: “[It] has become a country in which one is privileged to be Indo-Guyanese and cursed to Afro-Guyanese. It is not just not ok to be black in Guyana, it is a condemnation to a life of less.”

Foreign Migrant Workers in China

  9 July 2012

French photographer Benoit Cezard has taken a series of photos in which Caucasians pose as migrant workers, such as such as street vendors and sanitation workers in China. Jing Gao from Ministry of Tofu translated the story and netizens’ reaction on the photo presentation.

Africans in China about China in Africa

  7 July 2012

Tom from Seeing Red in China has two interesting posts about the perception of Africans in China on China's presence in Africa. The second post is a follow-up discussion by his friends from Zambia, Zimbabwe and Ghana.

Guatemala: Wave of Attacks Against Female Activists

  7 July 2012

In the last couple of weeks two female activists have been attacked. The victims are Lolita Chavez, an indigenous leader and member of the K’iche’ People’s Council, and human rights lawyer Yolanda Oquelí. Their cases have gone mostly unnoticed in mainstream media, but citizen and independent media have been raising awareness about their attacks and the dangers activists like them face.

Jamaica: Pardon Garvey

  6 July 2012

Geoffrey Philp is a member of the diaspora agitating for the exoneration of Jamaican national hero, Marcus Garvey.

Moldova vs. Moldova: Who is the Winner?

On June 28, 1940, Moldova was overrun by the Soviet troops, after it had been given up by Romania. The Soviet Union quickly added it to its territory. Was it liberation or occupation? Diana Lungu reviews the opinions of Moldovan netizens.

Peru: What They Didn't Tell You About Afro-Peruvians

  5 July 2012

On June 8, the cultural event “What they didn't tell you about Afro-Peruvians” took place at the National Afro-Peruvian Museum. The objective of the event was to make the Afro-Peruvian history and culture visible. Juan Arellano shares information, videos and audio files of the event.

Southeast Asia: Home to the World's Longest Ongoing Civil Wars

  2 July 2012

Southeast Asia is more than just white sand beaches, temples and resorts: it’s not often mentioned that the region is actually home to the world's longest ongoing civil wars, the most heavily bombed countries in the world, and the world’s longest communist insurgency.

United States: Crucial Decision on Anti-Immigrant Law

  2 July 2012

The United States Supreme Court recently issued their ruling in the case Arizona v. United States. The court struck down three of the four provisions of the controversial law SB 1070, but sent back to the lower court for consideration the provision that gives authorities the power to detain people that are suspected of lacking legal documents in Arizona.