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· January, 2011

Stories about Ethnicity & Race from January, 2011

Jamaica: Leah & Dog Paw

  31 January 2011

“Will she herald a new kind of representational politics since she has personally breached not only the uptown/downtown divide but also the legit/illegit one by literally commingling with a Don?”: Active Voice thinks that Leah Tavares-Finson “is a fascinating character.”

Ukraine: “Three Nations”?

  31 January 2011

Paul Goble of Window in Eurasia cites an interview [ENG] with a member of the Lviv City Council, who explains [UKR] that the real conflict in contemporary Ukraine is not between ethnic Ukrainians and ethnic Russians – instead, three different national projects are competing for dominance within the country.

Serbia, Kosovo: Comment on Dick Marty's Report

  29 January 2011

Belgraded.com comments on Dick Marty's “report on organized criminal activities committed by the Kosovo Albanian side during and after Kosovo conflict”: “As it turns out, there are now at least two things Serbs and Kosovars have in common – people who committed crimes during the war and politicians and other...

China: What about Chinese dads?

  22 January 2011

If you found yourself following the Amy Chua affair, you might want to check out this latest post from Jocelyn Eikenburg, American wife of a Chinese man: Chinese (and Asian) Interracial Wedding Dos and Don’ts.

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Venezuela: The Feast of the Divine Shepherdess

  22 January 2011

The feast of the Divine Shepherdess is celebrated every January 14 in Venezuela. Bloggers recalled and shared the origins and history of this Catholic tradition, while on Twitter and Facebook users shared photos and blessings. The political discussion that is present in the daily life of Venezuelans was also part of this year's celebration.

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Arab World: Racism and the Slave's Head Candy Controversy

  21 January 2011

Are we - Arabs - racist? It's really hard to tell. Some might argue that racism is against our religion, and that people are never discriminated against because of their skin colour. On the other hand, other tiny aspects of our lives might prove that we are. It seems to be normal, for instance, to make fun of black people [Ar] in the cinema, and even call a candy “The Slave's Head” because of its colour.

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Azerbaijan: Bloggers remember Hrant Dink four years on

  21 January 2011

Wednesday marked the fourth anniversary of the murder in Istanbul of Hrant Dink, the Turkish-Armenian journalist, editor, and human rights activist who advocated for reconciliation and friendship between nations, and especially estranged neighbors Armenia and Turkey. This year, however, the anniversary was also unexpectedly marked by many bloggers from Azerbaijan.

China: Glenn Beck takes aim at China

  20 January 2011

In case you missed it, Glenn Beck on Hu Jintao's US visit: Burger King kids meals are a Chinese plot for world domination, and so was Leonardo da Vinci. Turns out, it doesn't add up quite so neatly. Next week: the Chinese run Opus Dei, too.

Azerbaijan: Remembering Hrant Dink

  19 January 2011

The Önər Blog [AZ] remembers Hrant Dink, the slain Turkish-Armenian journalist, editor and human rights activist who was murdered in Istanbul four years ago today. The post is also available in Armenian. 1+1=3 [AZ], another Azerbaijani blog, also posts an entry in memory of a figure who stood for reconciliation...

Jamaica, Guadeloupe, T&T, U.S.A.: MLK Day

  17 January 2011

“Dr. King's importance lies in his challenge to expand our moral imagination”: Geoffrey Philp and other regional bloggers pay tribute to the late American civil rights leader Martin Luther King Jr.

Africa: Can white people be Africans? – Part 1

  14 January 2011

Can white people be Africans? Sentletse Diakanyo, a South African blogger, does not think so. He says, “Historically, the term “African” never had any ambiguous meaning. To Africans today it still does not have any ambiguous meaning. Africans across the continent and in the diaspora have long understood its meaning to refer to them as black people.”

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