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· February, 2011

Stories about Elections from February, 2011

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Armenia: Social Networks for Social Revolution?

  26 February 2011

With uprisings in Tunisia, Egypt and elsewhere in the Arab world, the extra-parliamentary opposition in Armenia is now seeking to replicate events in the former Soviet republic, and not least because 1 March 2011 will mark the 3rd anniversary of post-presidential election clashes which left 10 people dead.

Peru: Controversy Over Removal of Anonymity in Electoral Polls

  24 February 2011

A new policy preventing opinion polls from being conducted anonymously caused a storm in the press and on social networking sites. Finally, faced with a barrage of questions from the public and the press over its conduct, the National Jury of Elections was forced to retract the regulation.

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Uganda: No Signs of Egypt-Style Uprising

  22 February 2011

The 2011 Presidential Elections in Uganda have concluded relatively peacefully, with rolling results being announced over the course of the weekend. The blogging community and, in fact, the entire country are fairly quiet at this point, breathing a sigh of relief that things went as calmly as they did despite widespread accusations of ballot stuffing, voter intimidation, and other irregularities.

Peru: Wikileaks Cable Stirs Electoral Campaign

  22 February 2011

Juan Arellano in Globalizado [es] reports on reactions to a 2005 cable released by Wikileaks, which reveals that “Fernando Rospigliosi, former Minister of Interior in the administration of Alejandro Toledo, asked for the collaboration of the United States Embassy to carry out a campaign against Ollanta Humala.”

Côte d'Ivoire: Opposite Sides Demonstrated on February 19

  21 February 2011

On the blog “Actu et Opinions”, a post states: Meetings in Abidjan: 2 weights, 2 measures [FR] where one learned that demonstrators did not receive the same reception from the police force depending on whether they were pro-Ouattara or pro-Laurent Gbagbo. According to the Twitter feed #CIV2010, there were 3...

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Uganda: A Day After Uganda Elections 2011

  19 February 2011

Ugandans went to the polls Friday 18 February, 2011 for presidential and parliamentary elections. President Yoweri Museveni is expected to win. Below is a roundup of election-related posts and tweets a day after the elections.

Uganda: Kampala quiet after voting

  19 February 2011

Steven Youngblood says that the capita of Uganda, Kampala, is quiet after yesterday's elections. Meanwhile, President Museveni leads his rivals in early provisional results with 72% of the vote.

Turks & Caicos: Now Is The Time

  18 February 2011

The tcipost is calling on “every Turks and Caicos Islander with access to the Internet [to] please use all the social networks at our disposal to demand our right to self determination and bring awareness to our plight.”

Jamaica: Get Up, Stand Up

  18 February 2011

“Next year…Jamaica will celebrate 50 years of being an independent nation, but unless we take Bob Marley's words to heart and emancipate ourselves from mental slavery, our jubilee will represent nothing more than a fleeting, insignificant figure on time's continuum”: Ruthibelle thinks its time for Jamaica to grow up.

Uganda: Uganda Elections 2011 on Twitter

  17 February 2011

Ugandans will go to the polls tomorrow for presidential and parliamentary elections. The main candidates for the presidential race are President Yoweri Museveni, Dr. Kizza Besigye and Norbert Mao.Twitter users are busy talking about the elections using the #ugandavotes hashtag.

Uganda: New video for Uganda Elections 2011

  17 February 2011

The National Democratic Institute partnered with popular Ugandan musician Bobi Wine to release a video encouraging young voters to avoid election violence and to encourage them to report any election irregularities to UgandaWatch2011.

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