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· July, 2006

Stories about Education from July, 2006

Georgia: United National Exams

Ana praises Georgia's new higher education entrance exams, which are designed to limit opportunities for corruption and ensure that students entering higher education institutions are adequately educated and prepared for higher degrees.

India: First a blackboard, then the laptop

  28 July 2006

Atanu Dey on why One Laptop Per Child isn't the right solution to India's education issues. “Attention and funds need to be directed to those issues first before one starts buying laptops by the millions. Fact is that we need basic education (literacy, numeracy, etc) and secondary education.”

Mexico: Poll Numbers and Teachers Strike

  28 July 2006

It's Friday! That's right, time for Boz's famous poll numbers, wherein 48% of surveyed Mexicans believe there should be a recount while 53% believe that Calderon won the election. Lopez Obrador isn't among them, however, says Ana Maria Salazar: “After López Obrador proclaimed himself the winner of the presidential election;...

China: school close down

  27 July 2006

Peijin Chen in Shanghaiist puts together reports and commentaries concerning the shut down of a school because of high tuition fees. “The story of this school illuminates interesting issues confronting Chinese education and society.“

Fiji: Introducing a Fiji Webresource

  26 July 2006

The Babasiga blog introduces a web resource on Fiji. The site run by Australia based anthropologist Rod Ewins features old drawings, maps and engravings about Fiji.

Oaxaca: Photographing the Teacher's Strike

  26 July 2006

Mark in Mexico headed down to the city's Zócolo to assess and photograph ground zero of the teacher's strike. He describes the scene with patent sarcasm: “I took no photos because here is where most of the anarchists, socialists, communists and revolutionary groups have set up shop. There is every...

Chile, Argentina: One Laptop per Child

  26 July 2006

Tomás Pollak writes that the Organization of American States supports Nicholas Negroponte's One Laptop per Child plan as a solution to the digital divide throughout Latin America (ES). Meanwhile, Ariel Vercelli has posted an audio file (mp3 and ogg) of a recent discussion about implementing One Laptop per Child in...

Pakistan: Going abroad to study

  26 July 2006

Shirazi at Light Within reflects on why so many students from Pakistan go abroad to study. “In 1947, there was only one University of the Punjab. Today, we have almost 35 universities in the public sector, more than 100 in the private sector, and this number is growing with newer...

Iran: Dark days for Communication Sciences

Farid Modaresi, journalist & student activist says University of Communication Sciences is facing very dark days. The blogger adds several academics are forced to leave university such as Dr. Namk Doost [Fa]. Modaresi says university professors should do something and do not practice wait & see philosophy. They should be...

Thailand: Making Colleagues Jealous

  25 July 2006

Andrew Biggs in Thailand has one of the best jobs in the world. “When I got back to the office, all the male staff were very jealous of me. They wanted to know why I hadn’t invited them to go along with me.”

Hong Kong: learning from parent

  24 July 2006

ESWN translates a blogpost from learned friend on how children are being influenced by their parent in racial stereotype. “To the parents of the children — how do you teach your children!“

Hong Kong: Tree policy

  23 July 2006

The Chinese University of Hong Kong has been trying to upgrade their campus to international standard by large scale construction; and hundreds of trees in the campus are at stake. Yeahayeah in between psychosis and hysteria criticizes the university administration body and the Hong Kong government in their “management” rationality...

Brunei: Subsidies

  21 July 2006

The blogger at bruneiresources blog looks at the various subsidies that a Brunei citizen enjoys in the Kingdom. The blogger also introduces a local cartoonist's blog at the end of the post.

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